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Panasonic EVA1 Vs. Canon C200 – Which Is Better For Filmmakers?

This is been one hell of a week for camera announcements. Just a couple days ago, Canon announced their brand new C200, and today Panasonic finally unveiled their new budget-friendly cinema camera – the EVA1. Both cameras are clearly aimed at the same market (they’re each priced around $8k and share similar features/ergonomics), and both offer a lot of bang for your buck… At the same time, there are some pretty distinct differences between the two that should be taken into account before puling out your wallet to pick one up.

I haven’t had an opportunity to shoot with either camera yet (I wasn’t involved in any sort of beta testing on these models), so my thoughts as outlined here are largely based on specs. As such, I’ll be sure to do some more comprehensive reviews on both cameras in the future once I get to test them in the real world.

Let’s start with Canon’s C200 –

After many years of seemingly ignoring their video customers demands for better features and more competitive price points, Canon finally seem to be taking a step in the right direction with this camera. In fact, if I were to buy a C-series camera today, I would pick up a C200 in a heartbeat over a C300 II, as it offers more value in some respects at a lower price point.

Here are the specs –

  • Super 35mm CMOS Sensor
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF Technology
  • Dual DIGIC DV 6 Processors
  • 4K DCI and UHD, 1920 x 1080
  • 59.94p, 50p, 29.97p, 25p, 24p, 23.98p
  • Canon RAW Light, MP4, MP4 Proxy
  • Integrated EVF, 2 x XLR Audio Inputs
  • Rotating 4″ LCD Monitor, Camera Grip
  • 1 x CFast Card, 2 x SD Card Slots
  • 1 x SDI Output, 1 x Ethernet Connector
  • $7500

I don’t doubt for a second that the C200 will produce beautiful images, as it combines Canon’s excellent color science with a new RAW codec. The very fact that RAW can be recorded internally will be a huge selling point for narrative filmmakers, although 128GB CFast cards are only expected to record about 15 minutes of content.

That, combined with the fact that the camera only has a single C-Fast slot will likely make data management on set a bit trickier than with the C300 II or other non-Canon cinema cameras. Even still, that wouldn’t be a dealbreaker for me personally as CFast cards will only continue to drop in price over the next year, which will make this a non-issue over time.

The camera has some standout features as well, such as Dual Pixel autofocus which is ideal for those shooters operating as a one-man-band, and who need to pull their own focus. This isn’t a feature I would particularly use a lot myself, but I know many others who would!

The ergonomics of the camera look excellent too, and are right in line with Canon’s other C-series cameras which I’ve enjoyed using in the past.

So in a nuthsell, Canon finally seems to have gotten it right. A reasonably priced cinema camera that can record RAW internally and is actually positioned to be competitive in the market…

At the same time, it’s already starting to feel like Panasonic’s brand new EVA1 is raining on Canon’s parade.

PANASONIC EVA1

For years we have been waiting for Panasonic to release an AF100 replacement. At one point, Panasonic led the ultra low budget indie film community with their DVX100, although they eventually lost their footing when the large sensor camcorder market took off, and they were left behind.

Since then, they’ve offered some fantastic options on the low end (GH2/3/4/5), and the high end (Varicam), but they’ve had a gap in their product lineup where the AF100 once sat. It look them many years, but they have finally come out swinging with a new camera to fill this gap, and one that looks like it could truly disrupt the market.

We don’t have all of the details on the EVA1 yet, as it was just unveiled today. But here is what we do know –

  • Super 35 5.7K Sensor
  • 5.7K Raw output (with firmware update)
  • 400mbps / 10bit / 4:2:2 internal recording
  • Canon EF Mount
  • Dual Native ISO
  • V-Log Picture Profile
  • Up to 60p in 4K
  • Up to 240fps in 2K
  • Dual SD Card slots
  • Available this fall
  • Approximate price: $8000

It may have taken Panasonic ages to finally release this beast, but it looks like it was worth the wait!

Everything about the camera on paper looks incredible. It seems to offer so many of the same features as it’s bigger brothers (The Varicam/Varicam LT) in a smaller package and for less money.

For instance, much like the Varicam the EVA1 will have dual native ISO, which will make it an incredible option for low light shooters. It also includes V-Log out of the box, and the same great color science that Panasonic has been delivering with their higher end Varicams.

I recently released this short film that I shot on the Varicam LT, and really loved the images I got off the camera. It was so easy to expose and grade, and I can only imagine similar quality and results can be expected of the EVA1 too.

I especially love the fact that the EVA1 records oversampled 4K internally. This means that it’s recorded images will benefit from the added resolution of the 5.7K sensor, producing footage that will likely be superior to many cameras that shoot straight 4K DCI. As a bonus, in a future firmware update the EVA1 will be able to output 5.7K RAW, which is pretty incredible if you need higher resolution capture.

I’m also thrilled to see that Panasonic have opted for a full Super 35mm sensor, and not a MFT sensor. I have nothing against MFT sensors, but for many of us shooting narrative material, Super 35mm is optimal for so many reasons… Panny really seem to have gotten it right across the board.

CANON C200 VS PANASONIC EVA1

There’s no doubt in my mind the Canon C200 will be a great camera, but I can’t help but wonder how on earth it’s going to compete with the Panasonic EVA1…

Nearly all of the standout features that Canon offers, Panasonic can match or beat. This includes: Color science, internal 4K, native EF mount, Super 35mm sensor, and more.

Panasonic clearly have more specialty features, such as 240fps recording, dual native ISO, and 5.7K RAW capability, just to name a few. Although Canon does offer some of it’s own perks as well, such as internal RAW and Dual Pixel AF, which may be a draw for some users…

Personally speaking, I would hands down take the EVA1 over the C200. For the same price, the EVA1 simply does a lot more, and any of the C200’s specialty features that the EVA1 lacks wouldn’t be deal breakers for me. This includes internal RAW – as I know first hand just how flexible Pansonic’s 400mbps codec can be in post.

More importantly though, I like to invest in products from companies who are headed in a direction I believe in. I’m not saying that Canon isn’t, and in fact I think the C200 marks a well thought out change of course for their business. At the same time though, they still have an uphill battle to fight given their recent track record, and at the moment I simply believe in Panasonic as a brand more whole heartedly.

What do you think? Is there anything that would make you choose the C200 over the EVA1? Or do you feel the same as me?

Leave a comment below.

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About Author

Noam Kroll is an award-winning Los Angeles based filmmaker, and the founder of the boutique production house, Creative Rebellion. His work can be seen at international film festivals, on network television, and in various publications across the globe. Follow Noam on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook for more content like this!

82 Comments

  • cei
    December 18, 2018 at 4:09 am

    i am now comparing sony FS5ii, canon C200 and panasonic EVA1, since my wife promised a video camera for me later this year. thanks a lot for your comparison between the cameras. everyone of them has a fatal characteristic : C200’s 8bit420; EVA1’s auto focus and fxxk up moniter; FS5ii’s TV-like image. so difficult to choose from them. if C200 update its 8bit420 or EVA1 fixed its auto focus right now, i would definitely have no worries at all. what do you think brother?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      January 17, 2019 at 1:09 am

      Personally, I would go with the Canon C200. It’s not the most exciting on paper, but it will deliver a great image and has awesome color science. The EVA 1 is a great option too – but I’m not a huge fan of the Sony’s myself…

      Reply
  • John
    May 18, 2018 at 1:04 am

    I’ve thought the EVA1 would be better.. but as a documentary filmmaker, I’m now force to sell my camera only after 40 hrs of usage… Canon AF is a game changer! With a 4k resolution, you can not f*#@ up focus, nothing can fix that. EVA1’s focus peaking in Vlog is horrible, because it’s so soft that it can not find sharp edges. The EVA1 lcd screen is non-visible outside ( even with shade), just way too much glare. The C200 is a beast, I really wanted to like Panasonic.. but the got burnt too many time trying to make this camera work in a docu-setting.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 13, 2018 at 3:29 am

      Interesting to hear about your experience, John. Thanks for sharing.

      Reply
  • Craig
    December 10, 2017 at 11:13 pm

    I loved the idea of the Canon C200 because it is based on a great platform. But someone made a comment about no external output and how it is going to eat CFast cards. With only 15mins per Cfast that a problem. I do shorts on my BMPCC (metabones blah blah blah) and I love that look. I wanted to step up to a 4K platform with raw etc.

    Has anyone heard if the CFast to SDD device that I seen used on URSAs could be used here.

    The Panasonic looks like a winner for media reasons.

    Would like advice from people more experience than myself. Thanks in advance.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      January 7, 2018 at 10:56 pm

      Hey Craig – There are actually some CFast to SSD devices out there – I haven’t used any myself, but I do know they exist and seem to be working well for some!

      Reply
    • Kayode
      January 18, 2018 at 2:54 pm

      I think the CFast to SSD solutions require the door/slot for the CFast card to remain open (for the cable) to pass to the SSD unit. As far as I know the BMD SSD recorder is the only one that passes the data internally. As you may know the C100 & C300 will not record with the card slot open, my guess is this will be the same case with the C200.

      Reply
      • Noam Kroll
        February 1, 2018 at 3:37 am

        Interesting! Great to know, and thanks so much for sharing.

        Reply
  • Michael Schweitzer
    November 7, 2017 at 12:52 am

    Why are these two in the battle for best? Isn’t the new Black Magic in the same price range with potentially better specs?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      December 6, 2017 at 9:40 pm

      I love the Ursa Mini 4.6K and even shot my feature on it! I was just comparing these two as they came out around the same time and are targeting a similar demographic.

      Reply
  • Amir
    September 29, 2017 at 4:43 pm

    Great information Thanks for providing it for us
    Have a quick but important question?
    I have been using my canon 5d mark iii[It produce great quality pictures with some difficulties] and want to upgrade to another camera for my work – I am doing wedding and music videos so I need both raw shooting and compressed

    recently got a sony a7s ii and used it for couple of days in different locations and times[day and night] , It’s a good camera but I’ve noticed the noise level even on the lower iso is really high. Not saying you can’t use the footage but compare to my 5d mark iii the iso level was very high and I dont like that so just returned it.

    Now I am looking for a good camera to shoot raw and compressed video files
    the choices I have in this price point is the Canon C200 , Panasonic EVA1, Sony Fs7 , Black Magic Ursa Mini Pro

    Have been using Ursa mini 4.6k and it is a nice camera but not a good one for low light -Don’t know about ursa mini pro!!!
    Fs7 is kind of the same as a7s ii when you shoot internally in terms of noise level
    comes down to c200 and eva1 wich I love the footage comes from c200 but there is a lack for 4k bit
    rate
    watch the short films comes from eva1 but really cant understand the quality in terms of noise which is confusing
    have heard a lot about the panasonic varicam LT in terms of color but my question is The EVA1 is any better than fs7 in terms of noise level?what about c200?

    And what do you think is better for me because want to buy one camera in this price range and get second cam in slr/dslr for shooting 2 cameras [ example : if I buy eva1 will buy gh5 as well ]

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      September 29, 2017 at 5:41 pm

      Hey Amir! Thanks for the note. Unfortunately I haven’t shot yet with the EVA1 or C200 so I can’t speak to the noise levels from first hand experience. That said, if you need a two camera setup, the EVA1 and GH5 sound like an amazing combination! I’ll be sure to update the blog in the future when I get a chance to shoot with both cameras.

      Reply
      • Amir
        October 1, 2017 at 8:24 pm

        Thanks for your fast reply

        Waiting and Hoping the Panasonic EVA1 become the same as described!!!!

        And Thanks again for your helpful info

        Reply
  • Arthur
    September 2, 2017 at 3:58 pm

    To me, limiting Eva to 60p 8bit is the reason why I’ve decided to go with Canon for documentaries. I think its a big fail on Panasonic’s end to not give us 10bit 60p internally. Adding that huge monitor (Atomos) just for the slow-mo shots is making this system way too big for quick shots on the go.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      September 6, 2017 at 7:36 pm

      Fair enough – good points! Thanks for sharing them here.

      Reply
  • Kayode
    August 25, 2017 at 10:28 am

    Would still prefer Ursa Mini Pro if shooting feature or narrative work.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      August 29, 2017 at 12:26 am

      So far, I still think the Ursa Mini Pro is the camera to beat in that price range (at least for narrative). That said, I’ll need to shoot with both of these first to be 100% certain.

      Reply
      • Craig
        September 14, 2017 at 11:02 am

        I have a BMPCC and the lack of low light is the only thing that makes life hard. Give a Blackmagic light and it can’t be beaten. I am think EVA1 when I step up to 4K because of Blackmagic’s poor low light performance.

        Reply
        • Noam Kroll
          September 22, 2017 at 1:42 am

          I hear you on the BMPCC. I’m still blown away to this day by what it can deliver…

          Reply
  • Mike Brewer
    August 16, 2017 at 7:49 pm

    I am leaning towns the Panasonic for the 240fps and the dual SD card slot. But the 4K Raw internal in the Canon would be nice too. Tough battle. It’s nice to have options. I am exited to get my hands on both of them and see what works best for me.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      August 19, 2017 at 4:23 am

      Trying them both is definitely the best way to know… I will say though, that I’m sure the EVA1 will still produce an image that is very grade-able (given the bitrate), even if it isn’t RAW. That said, I’m sure the RAW on the C200 will be beautiful, so it is a tough call!

      Reply
  • Tor Arve K
    August 12, 2017 at 9:06 am

    Hallo. I am very bad in english, but I hope you understand me. I am filming some naturefilms with birds when they are flying and other things. I had a camera with followfocus and that was very good.
    Now I wonder to buy EVA-1 but how did the AF focus work with a Canon EF lens?
    Is it different fram C200?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      August 19, 2017 at 4:17 am

      Good question, Tor. I haven’t yet tried the auto-focus on both cameras, so I couldn’t tell you which would work better. But the EVA1 will certainly work with Canon EF lenses (including auto-focus). Best of luck…

      Reply
  • Gav
    July 7, 2017 at 12:06 pm

    Good write up Noam. I was initially excited by the Canon C200, but there are just too many complications and compromises with it. The main ones being the lack of slomo options and the shooting formats – small consumer mp4 files or huge unmanageable 1Gb/s RAW files.

    Reply
    • Derek
      July 16, 2017 at 4:21 pm

      The slow motion options on the C200 are better than the EVA1. The C200 will not crop the sensor when recording slow motion and the EVA1 does. Yes, the EVA1 may do 250fps over the C200’s 120fps but that huge crop is a deal breaker. It makes it impossible to get a truly wide shot when shooting slow motion. Canon realized this with the C300 MK II because that one factor drove people to the FS7. Uncropped slow motion is very important in this day and age, especially if you shoot music videos or commercials. It is less important for narrative. I am very glad Canon took the note from Sony and applied pixel binning to achieve full frame slow motion on the C200. I wish Panasonic would follow suit. Crops really suck and they take away creative options.

      Reply
      • Noam Kroll
        July 22, 2017 at 3:25 am

        Good points, Derek. And 120fps is still very slow in my books…

        Reply
      • Derek
        August 3, 2017 at 5:35 pm

        Turns out that Panasonic bumped the specs a tad since their release. It is now confirmed that the EVA1 will shoot 120fps in full frame without cropping the sensor. That is fantastic and makes this camera much more appealing.

        Reply
        • Noam Kroll
          August 18, 2017 at 6:01 pm

          Great news, and I agree! This should satisfy a lot of filmmakers who were concerned about the crop.

          Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      July 22, 2017 at 2:40 am

      Thanks for your thoughts, Gav!

      Reply
  • Marius
    July 2, 2017 at 8:39 am

    Just wondering which external recorder is able to record 5.7k raw video!?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      July 4, 2017 at 6:56 pm

      None that I know of as of now… I’m sure we’ll see some 6K/8K recorders soon.

      Reply
  • Flaaandeeers
    June 22, 2017 at 1:42 pm

    I will never have any of these little beauties. But from the specs and the specially the images I’ve seen from the Varicam LT -including your short film- I’d also take the Pana in a heartbeat.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 22, 2017 at 8:38 pm

      Never say never! And yes – the Panny definitely looks like it’s going to take the cake. Can’t wait to see how these two actually perform in the real world. That’s always the test…

      Reply
  • Martin
    June 15, 2017 at 7:00 pm

    Great article with some intelligent thinking from your followers.
    I’ll throw in my tuppence worth;
    For me, tech specs are secondary to usability. I’m generally a solo operator who some times picks up a Ronin.
    They’re both dam fine cameras and image quality is going to be jaw droppingly good [certainly in respects of the vast majority of clients].
    With that in mind, Canon’s incredible AF is the reason I’ll be opting for the C200 + my experiences of AF on the GH5 have spoiled my impression of the brand.
    Keep up the good work…

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 15, 2017 at 10:16 pm

      Great points, Martin. And truthfully, in my opinion Canon is able to deliver results that FAR outweigh their specs on paper – more so than almost any other brand. So for that reason alone I’m sure the C200 will find a nice home with many DPs and filmmakers.

      Reply
  • Jaime Valles
    June 8, 2017 at 4:26 am

    Nice article. For me, the C200 feels like the perfect indie cinema camera. Raw internal 4K DCI to CFast cards, insane touchscreen autofocus, 15 stops dynamic range. And then, when you’re not shooting narrative cinema, you can shoot 4K to SD cards in MP4 for fast turnaround for clients who don’t want large files or heavy grading. It works for exactly the types of shoots I do.

    The EVA1 looks very good, too, but once you’ve tried Canon’s Dual Pixel Autofocus, nothing else will do. It has forever changed the way I work, including for narrative cinema. I hate the term “game changer” but Canon’s DPAF really deserves being called that, especially when paired with a touchscreen. It’s like magic.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 8, 2017 at 5:15 pm

      Thanks for sharing this, Jaime. As I also stated in another comment, I think the AF is going to be a huge factor in the decision making process for a lot of filmmakers – especially those shooting in a run and gun style, or operating as one-man-bands.

      Reply
    • Derek
      June 19, 2017 at 6:21 pm

      I agree with this. DPAF is the beginning of truly usable autofocus and it’s only going to get better. It will take narrative shooters a while to come around, but eventually they’ll begin to understand how powerful autofocus can be and how much more accurate it can be than a 1st AC when doing things like flying around on a gimbal and shooting wide open. It can’t really replace a dedicated focus puller for all situations just yet, but it will get there.

      I’d say we are on the verge of the three biggest disruptions our industry has seen in years. I think we’ll see each of these finalized within the next decade:

      1. Autofocus/Touch Control Focus/Focus Tracking will dramatically reduce the need for focus pullers physically pulling focus. This transition will be really slow, because focus pulling has been one of the primary roles in narrative filmmaking since its inception. But it will happen over time. Instead, 1st AC’s will be using touch screens to select subjects and determine mood by dampening focus motors/servos speeds through software, shot to shot.

      2. Post stabilization tools will eliminate the need for heavy gimbals, steadicams and numerous other production stabilizers. We will be able to shoot entirely handheld and then choose how stable you want your camera to be in post. Look up “SteadXP” (which is being released this year) to see just how powerful post stabilization is about to become.

      3. The gap between expensive cinema cameras and consumer cameras will finally close. The only differentiation between cameras will be a company’s color science. The need for $50k cameras to achieve the highest quality image will be over. I think some of us have been waiting for this moment our entire lives and it is closer than it has ever been before.

      Reply
      • Noam Kroll
        June 22, 2017 at 8:32 pm

        Just checked out SteadXP. Looks amazing! Thanks for the tip.

        Reply
  • Brett Sherman
    June 7, 2017 at 1:15 pm

    All things considered, I might like to get the EVA1 over the C200. But I can’t because it’s looking like the AF system will be rather ineffective. The only thing they are promising is there will be some form of AF – not exactly inspiring confidence. And it’s awful on the GH5, so I wouldn’t expect any better and likely worse.

    As a one-man band my attention is diverted continually. Solid AF helps me astronomically. While I’d like to have a higher bit-rate option, I’m not willing to give up AF to get it. I’m pinning some hope on the promised XF-AVC to allow for better color correction.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 8, 2017 at 5:13 pm

      Good points, Brett. I definitely think the AF on the C200 is going to be a deciding factor for some filmmakers/shooters in the same boat as yourself… Although I hope we are pleasantly surprised with the implementation of AF on the EVA1. We’ll have to wait and see for now…

      Reply
  • van Dam
    June 6, 2017 at 10:21 pm

    Nobody needs time code in/out?

    Reply
  • Garry
    June 6, 2017 at 9:51 pm

    Do you think there’s still a gap to be filled with an updated AF100? It seems like Panasonic has resigned themselves to the fact that the EF mount has won the lens war, and that Panasonic is now basically a camera body maker – which puts them in a precarious business position if they fail on a GH6 or EVA2 in the future. People will just jump ship to the better body that uses EF when its time for an upgrade.

    I am a GH4 & GH5 user that would love to see a sub-$5000 cine camera that uses a “GH6” sensor and MFT mount in a cinema body with XLR and ND to avoid the Frankencamera setups we have to create. I think the AF100 was actually ahead of its time because MFT was lacking a user base- and now that you have the huge success of GH4 & GH5, you have many people in the MFT with no upgrade path.

    Thoughts?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 8, 2017 at 5:11 pm

      Interesting points, Garry. I think many people (like yourself) enjoy the MFT format for a lot of reasons – including the access to a wide variety of lenses, both native and non-native that can be adapted. That said, higher end cinema cameras such as the Arri Alexa or RED Weapon also don’t use any sort of proprietary mount, and typically offer PL or EF, since they likely want their users to have as many lens options as possible. I think the EVA1 follows suit in that regard. In my opinion, there is absolutely still room for a lower cost MFT cinema camera, although I don’t believe the EVA1 was a bad move at all for Panasonic, as many filmmakers very much embrace the Super 35mm sensor size over MFT.

      Reply
  • Nick J
    June 5, 2017 at 3:43 pm

    I totally agree. Even though I am thrilled with the rest of the specs announced, I am getting the EVA1 mostly for the 240fps in 2k! I am hoping they will announce an even higher framerate in 1080 closer to launch. I have always loved Panasonic since the DVX100 and HVX200. Currently a dual GH5 shooter, with two GH4’s for backup (also with a a7sII in the bag for once in a while low light). Most of my lenses are Canon EF mount, only a few m43 for smaller gimbal work. I was actually considering the Red Raven for the higher framerates. But that really comes in at over $10k with the needed accessories. Raw would be great, but the file size of raw makes it not practical for a lot of my projects. I’ll be completely fine with going external when I needed raw as an option. The EVA1 is the camera I was waiting for…

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 6, 2017 at 3:30 pm

      Thanks for your thoughts, Nick. And I think many of us are 100% with you in that we have been waiting years for this camera to be released. It’s looking like Panasonic is about to have a very, very good year.

      Reply
    • Derek
      June 19, 2017 at 5:59 pm

      Supposedly, the 240 fps of the EVA will be cropped, which kind of sucks. The C200 has full frame HD like the FS7.

      Reply
      • Noam Kroll
        June 22, 2017 at 8:31 pm

        Good point about the crop factor… Generally I am always skeptical about recording at such high frame rates for other reasons too (compression, etc.), but I think for some it will still be useful. Thanks for the note!

        Reply
  • Joe
    June 5, 2017 at 2:37 am

    Noam,

    Based on specs, Panasonic EVA1 or Ursa Mini Pro?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 6, 2017 at 3:28 pm

      Honestly, it really depends on what type of material you are shooting. I am a bit biased as I just shot a feature on the URSA Mini Pro and am blown away by the results… So I’d say if you’re shooting strictly narrative (and don’t need crazy low light ability), URSA Mini Pro is still an amazing option. But I can’t really say until I’ve tried the EVA1 for myself.

      Reply
  • Kagan Yochim
    June 4, 2017 at 8:50 pm

    Noam, I think this is a great post. I really wish the price point of the Panasonic was sub-$6000. I love my Panasonic cameras, HPX-170 and a GH4 – and would like to see an upgrade in a camcorder form factor that would be in line with the AF-100’s pricing.

    Panasonic’s 4K camcorder offerings have been confusing to say the least in the last two years. It would be interesting to see how those 4K images stack up to this new camera and ease of use in post.

    Thank you for sharing your great work! Kagan

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 6, 2017 at 3:25 pm

      Thanks so much Kagan! It would certainly be nice to see the EVA1 listed at a slightly lower price point, but who knows – maybe Panasonic has another camera in the works too? I wouldn’t surprised if down the road they made a baby brother to the EVA1, similar to how Sony has both the FS5 and FS7 in their line. We will see, but here’s hoping…

      Reply
  • Paul
    June 4, 2017 at 6:18 pm

    It is a shame to not see more robust codecs on the c200 I agree but having shot a lot of jobs on the c100 mkii, I have to say that what cannon get out of their low compression is pretty amazing. In the wide dynamic range setting I can get all the colour correction I need most of the time and because files are so small I’ve taken to buying and using16gb cards as if they were tape stock, (85 minutes!) and never recording over them which gives me extra peace of mind and a straight out of camera archive. Some things I like about the c200 aren’t getting much mention. 4 tracks of audio will be really helpful and could make up for the lack of time code in, with the addition of a tentacle sync, without loosing half your internal audio tracks. Also at the same time as recording raw 4K, you can record raw 2k to SD cards which could be another way of getting high res hd without totally breaking the bank.
    We’ll have to wait and see but I can vouch for the autofocus on the c series cameras, it really can make an impossible shot totally doable and effortless. Great time to be a filmmaker!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 6, 2017 at 3:23 pm

      Great points all around, Paul – especially your last. I couldn’t agree more that it is a phenomenal time to be making films. If these are the problems we have, we’re in good shape!

      Reply
  • theo
    June 4, 2017 at 1:48 pm

    No doubt, the EVA 1 will win hands down on specs alone. I like Canon cameras, but they’ve “done it again.” I mean “prosumer” HD in 2017! Really? And the 4k is also “hobbled.”

    I know I’ll be shot down by saying that the RAW capability on the C 200 camera is also a gimmick.
    But hear me out.
    This camera, both in fact, are aimed at “mid-tier” users. I don’t know of any “mid-tier” user that will want to shoot RAW. RAW and a quick turnaround just don’t go hand in hand. (And 15 minutes on expensive 128 gig CFast cards also has to be considered – as a negative.) Yes, I know they’ll become cheaper, but they’ll never be as cheap as SD cards.

    I could, however, see “pro-tier” users using the C 200 as a B or C cam for their RAW requirements.

    Let’s wait and see what kind of image the EVA 1 produces. But I just can’t see anyone that does broadcast work selecting the C 200 over the EVA 1.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 6, 2017 at 3:22 pm

      Interesting take on the RAW integration, Theo… I hadn’t thought about that angle, but I am curious to see how many users are actually going to shoot in RAW, especially (as you said) given the limited record time. Thanks for the note.

      Reply
  • Ana
    June 4, 2017 at 12:40 pm

    How is the colour going to be better in the EVA1? The panasonic has 10 bit, the C200 has 12 bit with raw…

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 6, 2017 at 3:19 pm

      C200 will have more bit depth, but the color science may still the same (or better) on the EVA1… We’ll just have to wait and see what it can do in the real world!

      Reply
  • Laurent
    June 3, 2017 at 10:09 pm

    Of course, that “under 8000 dollars” could be 6500 or 5000 even, nobody knows. Many sites just jumped to conclusions with their guesses that it will be priced between 7500-8000 dollars.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 6, 2017 at 3:18 pm

      Correct – it could be priced anywhere! Although I doubt we’ll see it much lower than $7500, at least if I had to guess…

      Reply
  • Lane
    June 3, 2017 at 7:03 pm

    EVA1 looks like a great camera. Honestly though, if the C200 was offering a broadcast ready codec that maintained much of the DR – I would seriously give it a look. Seems they don’t want to undercut their C300 mk2 ssales. As it stands now I think the EVA1 competes better with the FS7 and the C300mk2 – mainly due to the internal codec. Raw won’t work for my needs and I don’t have a desire to spend $7500 on 8bit 150Mbps 4k.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 6, 2017 at 3:17 pm

      Great points – the codec is a huge issue for Canon and may end up being the single biggest reason many shooters go with FS7 or EVA1 over the C200.

      Reply
  • Liam
    June 3, 2017 at 11:08 am

    Personally the fact that Panasonic have been cagey about how many stops of dynamic range it has is the only thing that worries me. Why wouldn’t they have already said if it was 14+ like the varicam? I think it could be 12 in line with the GH5 (actually about 10), which for me would immediately make the C200 more appealing.

    That C200 though not being 10bit 422 even in HD, unless you shoot raw, is supremely frustrating if you ever want to do a broadcast project without enormous file sizes. It’s such a deliberate saviour for the C300ii.

    I expect I’ll own one or the other of these by the end of the year. It’s a massive shame, because of the C200 had 10bit 422 I then that would be the end of that and I would preorder now.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 3, 2017 at 5:51 pm

      Very interesting point, Liam. If the C200 does have a big edge in the DR department, that will definitely pull a lot of people over to Canon’s side again. That said, I’m cautiously optimistic that we’re going to get significantly more DR than the GH5, but I guess we will have to wait and see soon!

      Reply
    • Pete
      June 8, 2017 at 1:39 am

      They’re still testing and tuning the sensor so they can’t say yet. It’s a completely new sensor still in development .

      Reply
  • Barry Griffin
    June 3, 2017 at 9:02 am

    2 great looking cameras. Seems there is a price difference in the UK ex vat prices stated so far are.

    C200 £6,300 ex vat
    EVA1 £ 8,200 ex vat

    Both have there strengths depending on the requirements for the shoot.

    Reply
    • Gordian
      June 3, 2017 at 3:20 pm

      Where did you saw these prices? The eva 1 will be under 8000,-

      Reply
      • Noam Kroll
        June 3, 2017 at 5:52 pm

        You’re correct. It is supposed to be under $8000, but that could even mean $7999. At this point, I have the price listed at the maximum that we’ll likely see it for, but will be sure to update when a more firm price is released!

        Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 3, 2017 at 5:50 pm

      Thanks for sharing this Barry!

      Reply
  • Piotr Naumowicz
    June 3, 2017 at 7:15 am

    I just wonder what specs will c200 new updated codec has? Will it match witch panny camera? As always for me ultimate concern is image – not only technical quality but also texture and feeling of the picture. Canon has also this awesome af that can be used on gimbals. In terms of raw and external recoreders in general – every time I have this bulky recorder on top of my cam I feel a little bit concerned about problems that may occur in terms of cabele conections also recorder make camera unbalanced and bulky and that is a real problem form me. In terms of panny 5.7k raw There is one issue – if people are bitching about how much storage will c200 raw consune for medium size project – then 5.7k cdng will be a real pain in the ass 🙂 and you will need a serious machine to even start thinking of fluid playback. And for the price of external recorder, media to that recorder, all the support gear to keep it sturdy you can buy few cfast cards for c200. Lets say you will spend 2400 GBP for inferno and media and support – this is aprox 4 or 5 cfast 256gb cards and year from now it will be 2/3 todays price. Just to thing to consider.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 3, 2017 at 5:49 pm

      Great points, Piotr. There are definitely some major pros for the C200 as well, so depending on how you like to shoot I wouldn’t suggest anyone rules it out. And as always, I will make the point that the specs on paper don’t tell the whole story. We need to see what these cameras can actually do on real world sets before making a decision either way.

      Reply
    • Kirk Kidner
      June 14, 2017 at 2:36 pm

      Th 5.7K is not a problem with storage as the camera is downsampling it to 4K. It is actually very efficient.

      Reply
  • Robert B.
    June 3, 2017 at 5:56 am

    That crazy good Canon AF might wind some people over for sure.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 3, 2017 at 5:48 pm

      Agreed. Especially for event shooters, documentary filmmakers, etc. Thanks for the note!

      Reply
  • Jonathan
    June 3, 2017 at 1:30 am

    Great write up. I only lean Canon because I’ve been holding out hope for a Canon like this for years and they seem to have finally delivered. Either way people go, it’s exciting to see more competition in this segment.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 3, 2017 at 5:47 pm

      Thanks Jonathan! And I totally agree with your philosophy on Canon. It’s so good to see they are finally getting it, and as you said – it’s great to have options and competition.

      Reply
    • Daniel Lobo
      June 4, 2017 at 11:18 pm

      Totally agree, me too. I was waiting so much for a good Canon camera like this. The 35 mbit codec in HD is a deal breaker though.

      Reply
      • Noam Kroll
        June 6, 2017 at 3:26 pm

        Seems to be the case for a lot of people, so you’re definitely not alone. I wonder if Canon will respond to the complaints with a firmware update in the future.

        Reply
  • Michael
    June 3, 2017 at 1:23 am

    I read that the eva is 8k for just the body. The c200 body only costs only 6k and 7.5k for all the accessories.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 3, 2017 at 5:45 pm

      That is correct – although really the only thing you don’t get with the EVA1 is the EVF… Also, we don’t know the final price yet on the EVA1. It’s supposed to be “under $8K”, but that could be mean $7500, which is worth taking into account too!

      Reply

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