Menu

Why I Just Picked Up The Fuji X-T2 For Filmmaking + My First Impressions

I’ve been in the market for a new DSLR/Mirrorless camera for a while now, and just this week I finally came to a decision and purchased the Fuji X-T2. For those of you that aren’t familiar with it yet, the X-T2 is a 4K capable, Super 35mm interchangeable lens mirrorless camera from Fuji that offers a lot of really unique features for filmmakers and photographers alike.

While Fuji’s X-T2 had been on my radar for a while now, and in fact I even listed it as one of my top DSLR/Mirrorless cameras to buy in 2017, there were a couple of other cameras I had been considering too. Specifically, it was between the Lumix GH5, Canon 5D MK IV, and Fuji X-T2.

All three cameras are viable options in their own right, but in order to finally make a choice I really had to consider my unique needs as a filmmaker.

The GH5 could have been an easy choice for me, as I’ve previously owned the GH2, GH3, and GH4, and am generally a big fan of what Panasonic is doing. In fact, if I didn’t already own a proper cinema camera, there’s a good chance I would have gone with the GH5 as it is the biggest workhorse out of the three cameras, and offers by far the most functionality.

Features like internal 10bit recording, high bitrate 4K, and internal stabilization naturally made the GH5 a contender, and for these very reasons I often recommend the GH5 to filmmakers that don’t already own a cinema camera. It’s a tool that can nearly do it all…

That said, when it came down to my purchase, I knew that I didn’t need my camera to be an “all-rounder”, since I would still likely shoot my larger scale projects on owned or rented cinema cameras. I was looking for a camera that would serve some of my smaller narrative and personal shoots, most of which call for me to shoot in a much different way than I would on a larger production. I didn’t need my camera to offer every single feature under the sun, but I did want it to offer the best version of the functions that I knew I really needed.

For this reason, I considered the Canon 5D MK IV for a while, as despite it’s technical shortcomings it has a lot to offer in other respects.

Unlike the GH5, the 5D MK IV can’t shoot 10bit internally, doesn’t have internal stabilization, and lacks many of the GH5’s other video features. But much like other Canon cameras, the 5D MK IV excels in the color department. And with that in mind, I was very tempted to pick up a MK IV, even though the camera is limited in so many other ways.

In the end though, I just kept coming back to the Fuji X-T2 as it seemed to offer me a best of both worlds scenario…

Here it is, pictured with the 35mm F/2 weather-sealed lens –

Although the X-T2 doesn’t have quite as many features as the GH5 – for example it only records F-Log to an external recorder and doesn’t have internal stabilization – it is still very much a camera designed with filmmakers in mind. It has a fantastic EVF, focus peaking, gorgeous 4K (down sampled from 6K), and loads of other controls that make it a breeze to shoot video with. So while it may not boast all of the same features of the GH5, it does have a whole lot of them, and some additional functionality that is completely unique to the X-T2… More on that below.

Perhaps most importantly for me, is the consideration of Fuji’s incredible color science. Given their history as a manufacturer of true motion picture film, no one in the DSLR/Mirrorless market really understands color as well as Fuji, at least in my opinion. I’ve owned the incredible Fuji X100T for a while now (which I use only as a stills camera), and know first hand how incredible Fuji’s colors can be. Based on this, the Fuji X-T2 rendered the 5D MK IV obsolete for my purposes, as the primary reason I was considering the MK IV was because of it’s colors.

So in the end, I saw the X-T2 as the perfect happy medium. It showed itself as a camera that offered loads of incredible GH5-style video functionality, but with color science that exceeded that of Canon.

Even the sensor size of the X-T2 is a bit of a metaphor for a best-of-both-worlds camera, as it has a Super 35mm sensor, which is smack dab in between the GH5’s MFT sensor and the 5D MK IV’s Full Frame sensor. There is of course no one sensor size that is perfect for all filmmakers – some prefer the more versatile MFT format, and others like the larger than life aesthetic of Full Frame. But for me, I’ve always been a huge fan of Super 35mm, so this was yet one more factor that drew me to the X-T2.

I also absolutely love the X-T2’s physical dials for ISO and shutter speed, as well as the dial that allows you to switch between stills and film mode. It makes shooting on the fly so quick and easy, and helps you avoid having to step into the menu unnecessarily.

The icing on the cake for me though, was the integration of Fuji’s Film Simulation modes into the X-T2.

Much like my fuji X100T, the X-T2 allows me to bake a film look into my video recordings (and photos of course). And with loads of amazing film looks to choose from, including: Astia, Velvia, Classic Chrome, and more, the in-camera possibilities with color are seemingly endless.

Those of you that read my blog often know that I am very much obsessed with color science, and often purchase my cameras based on their capabilities in the color department above all else. For this same reason, I often like working with cameras that can shoot in Log so that I have maximum flexibility in post when color grading.

At the same time, many DSLRs/Mirrorless cameras don’t do a great job of recording log internally. A great example was the GH4, which suffered from some noticeable banding issues when recording Log in-camera, and ultimately needed an external recorder for usable results.

The X-T2 only offers F-Log recording externally (perhaps for the very reason I mentioned above), and that’s totally fine with me as it offers something that I find even more useful: Film Simulation.

While of course I still plan on fully color grading my X-T2 shots, I’m very much looking forward to working with compressed footage that actually looks good straight off the cards, and doesn’t need to be manipulated too heavily. As opposed to heavily compressed Log footage (which can fall apart when you grade it), the images off the X-T2 when using Film Simulation already look incredible, which can mean less time in post and better quality results.

This will also save me a step in the color grade, as my workflow will simply consist of balancing each shot to match each other, and then applying one of my Cinematic LUTs to the footage, which will give them a texture and mood that is suitable for the story I’m telling.

If I were shooting on a proper cinema camera (that didn’t shoot RAW), I would shoot Log in a heartbeat as it still offers the most flexibility in post. But when working with a 100Mbit compressed video file, there is something to be said about capturing your look in-camera, so you don’t need to push the colors around in post too drastically.

FINAL THOUGHTS

As I often say, no camera is ever going to be perfect, and no camera can do it all… So with that in mind, we always need to make our purchases based on our own unique needs as filmmakers. For me, the X-T2 was an incredible option as it offered the best of both words between the GH5 and the 5D MK IV. And based on the cameras that I already own (and the gaps in my gear closet), the X-T2 complemented my kit very nicely. To top it off, the camera is also reasonably priced at $1599 for the body.

Some of you may be in the same boat as me, while others may be better suited with a GH5, a 5D MK IV, or something else entirely. The good news is, it’s 2017 and we have more choices than we’ve ever had before, and the market is filled with cameras that can meet the demands of filmmakers of all types.

At the end of the day, the best thing you can do is make your camera purchase based on your needs, and not someone else’s. And definitely don’t make it based on the specs on paper, as they will never lead you in the right direction!

With that in mind, I am still very interested in the GH5 (and I’m sure many of you are too), and as such I will be doing some extensive coverage on it over the coming months. I will likely also test out and review the 5D MK IV at some point soon.

I am also currently working on a detailed review of the X-T2, which I will release in the next few weeks along with some test footage, so be sure to stay tuned for that…

In the mean time be sure to subscribe to my podcast on micro-budget filmmaking, and to my newsletter for exclusive weekly filmmaking tips.

You can also follow me on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter here!

 

About Author

Noam Kroll is an award-winning Los Angeles based filmmaker, and the founder of the boutique production house, Creative Rebellion. His work can be seen at international film festivals, on network television, and in various publications across the globe. Follow Noam on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook for more content like this!

82 Comments

  • Dexter
    November 16, 2018 at 4:43 pm

    Love your website! It’s so informative. I was wondering if you’ve ever done a blog about what settings you have your Fuji’s at?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      January 16, 2019 at 7:53 pm

      Thanks Dexter! I haven’t done a post on that yet, but will definitely consider it for the future. Great idea.

      Reply
  • Linnea
    September 2, 2018 at 6:57 pm

    hi, im going to by a fujifilm x-t2 but i dont know witch lens to buy. Im mostly going to use the camera to film, but also street photografy.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      September 14, 2018 at 8:31 pm

      Hey Linnea – Have you looked into the 18 – 55 zoom lens?

      Reply
  • Dennis
    June 14, 2018 at 11:25 am

    Are you planning to make a separate or a updated review about the new update? Now it has F-Log and 120fps. I would love to hear (read) you opinion.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      July 13, 2018 at 3:05 am

      Just did an article about F-log! Still on the homepage if you check for it now…

      Reply
  • Chris
    April 26, 2018 at 7:02 pm

    Just came across this… Use a cinema camera for work that requires it, but for all the stuff where it’s not necessary to bring it out i’ve been relying on the 1dxii/5div A/B combo. Came across this article in my search to replace the GH5 because even though we’ve been using that w/ the GH5s the MFT sensor look has just been bothering us, and Sony’s newest offerings the A7Riii and A7iii just require way too much extra full frame native glass to be purchasing for no reason other than for those cameras, so the X-T2 became the obvious choice (along w/ the color science that everyone seems to be raving about)

    Thanks for this article because I think we are going to try it out!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 4, 2018 at 7:50 pm

      Awesome, please let me know how you like it!

      Reply
  • Kong
    March 12, 2018 at 4:13 pm

    Hi Noam,

    Thank you for a great article! I was planing to shoot a short film with my new Fuji XE-3. I used to rent BMCC or Canon C300mkII for video works. But I’m thinking of using this small cam with 4K ability since the footage look gorgeous!

    I wonder if you can give some advice on the film simulation that you think most suit for shooting video (with some small adjust later in post maybe). And what is your basic setting for video? (Highlight, Shadow, Sharp, Color, etc.)

    Thanks !

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      April 2, 2018 at 3:57 am

      Sure – I almost always leave the settings stock (in terms of highlights, sharpness, etc.) and just use the ProNeg STD or Astia Soft film simulations.

      Reply
  • Warren
    January 27, 2018 at 9:17 am

    Hi, thanks for the review. I’m currently trying out a friends Fuji xt2 to use as my b stills camera and to use for video. I am mostly a stills photographer but do occasional video for my own projects.

    What shutter speed would you reccomend for video at 24/25fps? I noticed on the shutter dial there is 1/60th of a second but no 1/50th. Sorry this is an ignorant question.

    Cheers.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      February 1, 2018 at 3:59 am

      Hi Warren! If you set it at 1/60 and then use the little thumb wheel at the top right of the back of the camera, you can dial it back to 1/50.

      Reply
  • Bob Ditty
    January 26, 2018 at 7:32 pm

    I’m a photographer and a filmmaker. I have the GH5 which I absolutely love for video. However, I had a chance to check out the XT1 for photos and absolutely fell in love with the colors. And quite frankly, the GH5 colors and sharpness are terrible for photos. I have messed around with settings to try and get it close to what I like but it’s a nightmare. Considering adding the XT2 for photos and for a second video shooter. Have you compared the GH5 CineD profile with that of XT2 profiles? Are some of them close where I could get similar looking results? I’m curious. I need to see if this would be a good complementary camera for video as well as my main photo shooter.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      February 1, 2018 at 3:58 am

      Hi Bob – great question. I think the GH5 colors and X-T2 are quite different straight off the cards. They could certainly be matched somewhat in post, but it will take a fair amount of work if you want to get it close to perfect… That said, you could always go with 2 X-T2s 🙂

      Reply
  • […] Noam Kroll – Why I Just Picked Up The Fuji X-T2 For Filmmaking + My First Impressions […]

    Reply
  • Claudiu
    January 9, 2018 at 8:12 pm

    Hey Noam!

    I’m dwelling between a new camera, Fuji X-T20 vs Sony A6300. Do you think its that hard to color correct and grade Sony footage to make them look like Fuji? My dream camera should have everything A6300 has and colors of Fuji.

    I assume in big movie productions anyway they are using multiple cameras and them matching them in post.

    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      January 18, 2018 at 6:24 am

      That’s a tough choice! If it were me, I would definitely go for the X-T20, but many people would disagree. You really can’t go wrong either way, but if we’re strictly talking about color, I don’t think the Sony will ever look exactly like the Fuji… Even with lots of color grading.

      You are right that many productions will color correct different to match cameras in post, and you can certainly attempt to match these two cameras in the same way. That said, there are some image characteristics that you won’t be able to change in post, so the look will never be identical.

      Reply
  • Serkant
    December 21, 2017 at 1:02 pm

    Dear Noam,

    Is great to hear your opinions about XT2 with many details.

    I recently started video shoots. My main camera is a Nikon D750 for photography, and ı bought XT20 for next video shoots.

    And i was paning to buy 23 mm f2 for main video shoots, but after i ve read some forums i thought it s not a good idea because no OIS on lens.. Even not image stabilization on body.

    Still i think 23 mm f2 would be good with XT20 but maybe i m wrong? Maybe i really should buy an OIS lens.

    I usually take photo stories on travels and i want to make 30 min short documentaries about this stories.

    It would be great to hear your opinions.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      January 7, 2018 at 11:12 pm

      Hi Serkant – If you do a lot of handheld work, I would definitely get an IS lens. Even the kit lens (18-55) is quite good and has built in IS!

      Reply
  • David Edwards
    November 2, 2017 at 7:29 am

    Hi Noam… stumbled across your blog post about the X-T2 choice. I’m going to be an incidental film maker shooting small clips for our fashion shoots and small on the fly clips for my commercial client work. I already have the X-T2 for stills but have recently upgraded my stills to the GFX… rather than sell the X-T2 I’m looking at film making with it… are there any “idiot’s guides” that you could point me to or articles of your own? If there are I’d be grateful for any links or assistance… many thanks in advance. Best, David

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      December 6, 2017 at 9:31 pm

      Hi David – great question. I don’t know of any such guides right now, but I am planning to release some more XT2 content here on the blog in the near future, so stay tuned for that! In the mean time, one tip I have it to try using the Pro Neg Std film simulation. That’s been my go-to most recently.

      Reply
  • Ted
    October 7, 2017 at 8:56 pm

    Great article, thanks!

    How’s the rolling shutter, lens compatibilities, low-light performance, filmmaking gear/accessory market/compatibility (by Fuji or otherwise)?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      October 12, 2017 at 8:38 pm

      No problem! Rolling shutter is about average and has never been a major issue for me. It’s quite compatible with other lenses since it’s a mirrorless camera – I am currently using mostly Canon glass on mine. It has excellent low light performance, but not quite at the same level as you might expect with a camera like the Sony A7S II. And with regards to accessories, there are definitely a lot out there… Certainly more than enough for my needs! Hope this helps…

      Reply
  • Jason mark Harris
    September 25, 2017 at 8:03 am

    We have also been shooting the xt2 and love them, we have been missing ibis a little after shooting the a7ii for a while but love the feel and style of shooting and the colours are great. Saying that I just got use an a7sii and shot with it Saturday for the first time, didn’t enjoy shooting with it at all, time will tell if I enjoy the footage, t safe to say at this time the xt2 is a clear winner, and now they are adding 4K for the xpro2. Even better.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      September 29, 2017 at 5:35 pm

      Awesome! I’m always happy to hear when other people are having similar results with the X-T2. Thanks for the note…

      Reply
  • Simon
    September 12, 2017 at 7:50 am

    Regarding color science: just use the amazing EOSHD Procolor sets for Canon-like ooc jpegs and videos for Sony, or apply them in post with Panasonic – I had never been happy with Sony and Panasonic colors, but these color profiles (no advertisement intended) fixed it for me, and made the choice easier. Nevertheless, I am more and more tempted to try a Fuji!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      September 22, 2017 at 1:40 am

      Hi Simon –

      I’ve seen some pretty good results using those settings online, but I still subjectively prefer the Fuji look. Just a personal preference… But it’s good to know Sony shooters have more options these days.

      Reply
  • Angelo
    September 10, 2017 at 2:52 pm

    Hi Noam I wanted to ask you what you think of xt1 to shoot videos and any defects thanks and good work

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      September 22, 2017 at 1:30 am

      Hey Angelo! I’ve seen some beautiful looking X-T1 video footage, but I’ve never shot with it myself so I can’t speak to any shortcomings… That said, based on the limited footage I’ve seen it seems like a camera that could definitely deliver great results in the right hands.

      Reply
  • Gregory Althoff
    August 20, 2017 at 6:15 pm

    Hey Noam,

    Read your review, but am a little confused after seeing your Vimeo channel.. since none of the videos I saw on there appeared to be filmed on the XT2.

    I have had a really hard time finding anyone posting good XT2 videos that look cinematic or professional, most of the videos I’ve seen (and I’ve searched haha) have really bad color grades, bad dynamic range, or really harsh contrast. This makes me wonder if I should just get the GH5 hoping it’s photo capabilities will be good enough..

    unfortunately for me, it comes down to having a camera that can do both for me and white photographer wife, and she’s not too keen on getting a GH5 since she’s used to shooting full frame 5D’s..

    Where are the good / professional / cinematic looking XT2 clips!?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      August 29, 2017 at 12:15 am

      Hey Gregory! You are correct that none of the films on my Vimeo account were shot on this camera. I am working on some projects with the camera now however, and will aim to release some substantial X-T2 content in the future. Thanks for the note.

      Reply
  • Charusheel Mane
    August 18, 2017 at 11:37 pm

    Hi Noam,
    Really appreciate for giving valuable your time here.
    Fujifilm X-T2 UHD 3840 ?

    There are two 4K numbers, and you’ve identified both of them.

    One comes from TELEVISION, and that’s the 3840.

    It really comes down to aspect ratios. TV is 1:1.78 (16×9) , whereas cinema is 1:1.85 or 1:2.35

    soooo.

    3860 is the 1.78 ratio for TV or sometimes called UHD.

    4096 is the CINEMA standard, allowing for 1:1.85 (it’s actually 1.89 but they allow some wriggle room for masking in the cinema)

    I am confused UHD VS DCI ?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      August 19, 2017 at 4:29 am

      You are absolutely correct. Technically, the X-T2 is UHD since it has the 16 x 9 aspect ratio. Out of habit, I often refer to both 4K DCI and UHD as 4K, although there is definitely a distinction there as you have pointed out. Hope this helps clear things up!

      Reply
  • Guy McLoughlin
    August 10, 2017 at 3:29 pm

    Hi Noam,

    I know that camera choice is a personal issue that everyone has different ideas on… But it drives me crazy when I hear people going on about a specific camera’s color science without showing clear examples of how one camera looks compared to another.

    I wish that somebody would do a proper blind camera comparison where each camera is shoots the same scene with it’s best settings, and then a qualified colorist puts the finishing touches on the captured footage.

    Yes, it would be a lot of work, but I honestly think that many people are being influenced by camera default settings, by shooting with a poor choice of camera settings, and by not understanding how important color work in post is.

    I remember the Zacuto camera shootout around 2012, where many people’s preconceived ideas were thrown out the window when it came to looking at the finished footage without knowing which camera has shot what. Some higher end cameras that were expected to do better were being beaten by lower end cameras, and this was messing with people’s heads.

    Cheers.

    – Guy

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      August 19, 2017 at 4:16 am

      That would be great, Guy. I’d love to see something like this too…

      Reply
  • Charles
    July 14, 2017 at 3:01 pm

    Hi Noam, I’ve been a photographer for over 20 years and have been writing screenplays for the past 11 years. I started out with film cameras and purchased my first dslr (Nikon D610 and five Nikon Ai-S prime lenses) about 3 years ago. I’ve shot two short films with my D610 and wanted to shoot my first feature film with a screenplay that I’ve written. I want to upgrade my camera to one that has good color science and good quality optics with a ‘filmic look’. I was looking towards Blackmagic: Pocket, Micro, Cinema Camera 2.5k or my ultimate favorite being Ursa Mini Pro. Then the Gh5 looks to be an option as well. What would be your recommendation? Also, would I need to invest in new glass or would my Nikon glass be optically good for the big screen?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      July 22, 2017 at 3:24 am

      Thanks for the note Charles!

      If you can afford to spend the extra money on the URSA Mini Pro, I would highly recommend it. That said, all the other Blackmagic’s would look great too! It all depends on your needs, budget, and creative preferences.

      Lens-wise – I would certainly think your Nikons should hold up really well. The only consideration would be which camera/lens mount you are using to ensure they are adaptable. Otherwise, I think the quality of them is fantastic.

      Reply
  • Benjamin
    July 13, 2017 at 2:15 am

    Hi Noam, since a detailed review of the X-T2 is taking longer than you anticipated, do you think you can post a brief one-two paragraph synopsis of your experience with the camera? I have been coming for this review since May almost on a daily basis trying to decide on my next camera purchase… Thanks!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      July 22, 2017 at 3:19 am

      So sorry to keep you waiting Benjamin! I was off sick for a couple of weeks and then went straight into a production. That said, the review is coming this week! Stay tuned.

      Reply
  • Kyle
    July 6, 2017 at 3:24 am

    After reading this post I rented the X-T2 and I love it but the only thing I’m worrying about is not having IS. I saw you’re using the 35mm lens. Are you mainly shooting tripod or do you think shooting shoulder mount is not an issue?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      July 22, 2017 at 2:40 am

      Hey Kyle,

      I am mainly shooting with the 35mm on a monopod or tripod. Unless I’m shooting slow motion, it’s tough to get a smooth handheld shot… That said, if you use a basic rig, cage, or shoulder mount, you would be fine!

      Reply
  • Miguel
    June 24, 2017 at 2:21 pm

    Hi Noam, i make my living with low cost Real Estate video Tours, and we currently use the Lumix G5 that is an old camera. And now in 2017 we want to use a better camera to improve the image quality of our videos and I am undecided between the Panasonic GH5 and the Fujifilm X-T2. Which camera do you think that is better between the new GH5 and the Fuji XT-2 for the type of videos that we do. One important factor to me is that i need to spend the less amount of time possible doing Color Correction, Is true that the video footage from the XT-2 require less time in the computer doing color correction ?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 30, 2017 at 8:57 pm

      Hi Miguel – great question about the color process when comparing GH5 to X-T2. I would say that the X-T2 definitely needs less work in the color suite, however that applies mainly to narrative material. If you are doing real estate videos and want them to look as neutral as possible, the GH5 will still very much deliver on that front. It might not always look as “cinematic”, right out of the box, but it may be more appropriate for your needs.

      One advantage of the X-T2 though, is the larger sensor size which may help you when you need a wider FOV, shooting inside and in tight spaces. If you do go with the GH5, I would recommend considering a speed booster to get a wider perspective with your glass (or get some very wide angle lenses), as I would imagine that might be important for you. Hope this helps in some way…

      Reply
  • Jonathan
    June 15, 2017 at 7:40 pm

    Thanks for this review Noam,

    I’m wondering if you have any opinion or experience with the Sony A6500 for filmmaking? I know the autofocus system is pretty good, the fact that there’s no crop in 4k and I like the “touch to focus” option, especially when doing photojournalism and concert videography, but the A6500 severely lacks the form factor and build of the X-T2. Plus the Sony E-mount/APS-C lens selection is incredibly poor, so I’d end up using a full frame Sony lens instead most likely. As “innovative” as the A6500 is, I’m becoming more and more tempted by the overall better lens choices for Fujifilm now. Is there anything you can tell me to further sway my decision-making from Sony to Fujifilm (aside from better color rendition)? Thanks

    – Jonathan

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 15, 2017 at 10:18 pm

      Hey Jonathan! Honestly, I have limited experience with the A6500, but from what I’ve heard it is truly a great camera. As you said, the big drawback is it’s color science (which is one of the deciding factors for me), but if that isn’t an issue for you, than it’s certainly a viable option. Both are great cameras, it really just comes down to personal preference. Best of luck!

      Reply
  • T Nama
    June 5, 2017 at 12:50 pm

    Great article, making me think twice about my potential GH4 purchase with lots of accessories. I’m not in a hurry.

    Still waiting for your X-T2 detailed review? Been checking every week…

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 6, 2017 at 3:28 pm

      I’m working on it! Have been away for a few days this week, but am chipping away at the review and will post it as soon as I can. Thanks for the note.

      Reply
  • SandeepChahal
    May 26, 2017 at 8:28 am

    Hi Noam, Thanks for spending time to answer so many questions on your blog. It must be very time consuming. One day God will pay you back for helping others. I have an another question. You could answer here or perhaps do seperate article on your blog, as you wish. How will a nice colour video of Fuji XT2 will hold up on a big cinema screen when projected by a DCP as compated to 4:2:0 of Sony A7Sii, GH5 4:2:2 10 bit or ProRes and Cinema DNG raw of Black magic etc.?

    I really wanna know what happens to the colour and resolution of a Fuji XT2 internally recorded video and a 4:2:0 Sony A7Sii mirrorless camera internally recorded  footage when it is projected on a big cinema screen as compared to a celluloid film or a raw or Pro Res format footage.

    Looks like Fuji XT2 videos will be like Digital Bolex d 16 and Ikonoshop raw cameras. So, I am eagerly waiting your videos. God Bless!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 30, 2017 at 6:10 pm

      Thanks for the kind words, Sandeep! I believe I just saw this question on my Facebook page as well, and will be sure to post an article in the future to shed some light on this topic as it probably requires a fair amount of detail. Stay tuned and I will post an update in the future when I can! Thanks for the suggestion.

      Reply
      • Sandeep
        May 31, 2017 at 5:48 pm

        That is awesome! Thank you very much. Today I went to assist a DOP who was operating RedEpic. It is so disheartening to see big heavy cameras lying stiff on huge tripods. So limiting in so many ways. If Fuji XT2 video is as good as it looks ( colorwise), I feel that it will be a better film camera as compared to RedEpic. That DOP told me that 4:2:0 8 bit looks equally good on cinema screen as these days projectors have seperate settings for 4:2:0 or 4:2:2. The only difference raw files gives you is added advantage of changing image drastically in post e.g. changing day shoot image to night. But if in camera image is showing cinematic images (film emulations of Fuji XT2), there is no need to shoot in raw as 4 k image of Fuji wont lose any colour and resolution when projected on big screen. But I wish I kbews Red Epic workflow and personally own as there is so much demand of it in the market where I live, just market needs I guess. I am eagerly waiting for your XT2 videos . Many thanks.

        Reply
        • Noam Kroll
          June 1, 2017 at 5:30 pm

          Thanks for the note, Sandeep! The Epic is a great camera, but as you said the X-T2 (or cameras like it) offer some big advantages over traditional cinema cameras… Mainly in terms of usability and operation for those of us who work as one-man-bands. I can’t wait to share some footage soon, and will be sure to post a new article on that front as soon as I can. Stay tuned!

          Reply
  • Alessandro
    May 24, 2017 at 1:17 pm

    Ehi Noam! Great article! Can you advise on swapping a C100mkII for the gh5? Could that mirrorless can do the same work at the same quality the Canon could achieve? Thx man

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 24, 2017 at 9:20 pm

      Thank you! In terms of sheer image quality, the two are going to be in the same ballpark… At least in my opinion. Canon might have an edge in some areas (color science), whereas the GH5 might have an edge in other areas (higher frame rates). The bigger question though, is how you like to shoot –

      The C100 is a much different type of camera as you know, so there will be some tradeoffs in terms of usability and overall ease of use. So in other words, don’t worry too much about differences in image quality (since they won’t be massive), but instead make sure you take into account the rigging, ergonomics, and other key factors too!

      Reply
  • Brett
    May 19, 2017 at 10:30 pm

    Thanks Noam. I placed my order yesterday and picked up an adapter for my Nikkor 50mm. I’ll keep you posted how it works. Not quite sure what Fuji Lens I am going to pick up yet, but I do like the idea that they are small and compact.

    Cheers

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 24, 2017 at 9:00 pm

      Awesome to hear! Please do keep me posted, I’d love to hear more about your experiences once you have some time with the camera.

      Reply
  • Brett
    May 18, 2017 at 12:42 am

    Hi Noam, Great article.

    I have been constantly researching mirrorless cameras for my next purchase. I owned the BMPCC and loved the images, though I ended up selling it because I wanted a photo camera to travel with and shoot photos as well. I have been weighing the options of the GH5 and the SonyA7sii. I shoot on the A7sii at work, though like you mentioned, I just didn’t love the colors. I was a big fuji stock fan back in the day in college and was intrigued with this camera when I read this article.

    My main concern is lens compatibility. I have a few projects lined up and am going to invest in a basic set of primes. I’ve look at the zeiss Loxia’s and voigtlanders. I currently own a 50 nikkor 1.2 which I love however I have read a few articles that all praise the X-t2 though highly recommend using their native glass, which I am not familiar with. I have a hard time convincing myself to invest in Fuji Lenses when I could go a different route and use these lenses in the future.

    In your experience with the X-t2 are you using native lenses or using an adapter with other lenses? And lastly considering you seem like your are sold on this camera, what lenses would you consider investing in knowing that the expiration date on cameras these days is shorter than a gallon of milk? 🙂

    Thanks again for the article, it was extremely helpful!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 18, 2017 at 4:59 pm

      Hey Brett – thanks for the note! Glad to hear you enjoyed the article, and hopefully I can answer a couple of your questions here…

      Generally speaking, when it comes to glass I almost always aim for all of my lenses to have the same mount (usually EF, because I have several EF mount cameras). However, in this case I went with a Fuji 35mm prime, and plan to get more Fuji lenses as they work really well natively with the X-T2 natively. I also wanted smaller/mirrorless lenses to walk around with more casually, as opposed to the larger EF glass.

      I can’t speak to adapting lenses on the X-T2, as I have very limited experience in that regard, but I can say that the Fuji X lenses are really beautiful, well built, and produce amazing images. So long as Fuji continues to be a contender in the market, they will hold their value… So even if down the road you switch away from Fuji, you’ll still likely be able to sell your Fuji glass to buy something new.

      One of the best things about the X-T2 (in my opinion) is the combination of glass/body. I think the whole package works together really well, so if you do plan on getting an X-T2, I would seriously consider the lenses! You could even just start with a single mid-range zoom lens so you aren’t investing too heavily right off the bat.

      Reply
  • Brandon Segelke
    May 16, 2017 at 3:58 pm

    Noam, when will the in depth review and test footage come out? This may be my camera of choice to purchase but the internet really lacks any video content out of the camera from a talented individual. Also do you know any great test videos out there I could view until yours comes out?

    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 16, 2017 at 7:44 pm

      I am working on it as we speak! I don’t have an exact date (as these things can take a while to put together), but I’m aiming to release something within the next 2 weeks.

      Reply
  • […] X-T2 Noam Kroll – Why I Just Picked Up The Fuji X-T2 For Filmmaking + My First […]

    Reply
  • Gugu
    May 15, 2017 at 2:51 pm

    Dear Noam

    Thanks for this great article and introducing Fuji xt2 to me. It is indeed a great film camera by looking at the images and film simulations. But how are you going to deal with 10 minute recording? Swap battery every 10 min to keep it cold?

    I am a student film maker and currently saving money to buy a camera. Its either between GH5, Sony A7Sii, or Fuji XT2 now. Fuji images look more cinematic and film like than 10 bit Gh5 and Sony A7sii videos.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 15, 2017 at 9:35 pm

      Hey Gugu – thanks for the note! For me, the 10 minute record limit isn’t an issue at all as I mainly shoot narrative material. This means that my average take is only 2 or 3 minutes, and in the odd case where I need to record longer than 10 minutes, I don’t mind cutting and starting to roll again on a new take. The camera shouldn’t overheat (and you don’t need to swap out the batteries), but you will need to cut and re-roll… Good luck with everything and let me know if you have any more questions!

      Reply
  • Kody Cunningham
    May 14, 2017 at 7:42 pm

    I have the Ursa Mini 4.6 and have been wanting to find a good B camera option. Of course I was looking into the bmpcc 2.5k and the micro, but I also have been looking for a stills camera. I’d love to see how well the X-t2 cuts with the Ursa. If they have similar color science it might knock out two birds with one stone.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 15, 2017 at 9:31 pm

      Likewise! I shoot a ton on the 4.6K but plan to use this as a B or C cam in certain scenarios. If and when I get a chance to test them together, I’ll be sure to post the results here.

      Reply
  • Martin Treacy
    May 14, 2017 at 1:25 pm

    Jeremy – all of the fuji zooms (bar the 16-50mm f2.8) have OIS. The ‘kit’ zoom 18-55m F2.8-4.0 (actually so much better than the usual kit zoom) is apparently pretty good for video, and has OIS and very decent image quality. The 10-24mm, 55-200, 50-140 zooms all have OIS. (And also the 18-135 for anyone looking for a single zoom lens to cover the classic 28-200mm full frame equivalent).

    None of the primes have OIS unfortunately, and of course Fuji have made it very clear that they are not going to put IBIS on their X-series cameras (for a variety of technical reasons). However we all managed to shoot without image stabilization in the past, and there’s nothing to stop filmmakers putting the X-T2 on a tripod or monopod, or using a gimbal.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 15, 2017 at 9:25 pm

      Thanks for sharing this, Martin. Also – I agree with you about the tripod/monopod, etc. I would always rather stabilize properly than use internal IS, even if I’m using a camera where that is an option!

      Reply
  • Mo
    May 14, 2017 at 6:58 am

    Great choice! I’ve been shooting video with my X-T2 since it’s release. I’m also coming from Panasonics (GX7 and G7) for video Nikon for stills, until I purchased my first Fuji X-E2 back in 2011. The first time I went to edit a video I shot with the X-T2 as CamA and the Pan G7 as CamB, I was shocked to see how spot on the skin tones were in the vectorscope.

    Take a look at my work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0eeGrOOM58

    I’ve used your LUTS previously when I was looking for the right Panasonic camera to shoot video alongside my X-E2, so a belated ‘Thanks!’

    Pick up a Zhiyun Crane to take care of the stabilization issue and any of the OIS lenses. I had to look for a used kit 18-55 lens that I had sold previously from the X-E2, and I’ve been using that for professional jobs and nobody has ever questioned the quality of the footage.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 15, 2017 at 9:24 pm

      Hey Mo! Thanks for the note and I appreciate your support of the site/use of my cinematic LUTs. I will be sure to check out some of your work soon… Thanks for sharing a bit of your story here.

      Reply
  • Jeremy Phua
    May 13, 2017 at 9:10 pm

    nice writeup! but any mention about the the important OIS needed for video?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 15, 2017 at 9:23 pm

      Hey Jeremy! I’m not a huge fan of using internal IS (although I would certainly be happy if the X-T2 had the option)… Although some of Fuji’s lenses have built in OIS which should solve the issue for people using Fuji glass…

      Reply
  • Steve M.
    May 13, 2017 at 12:59 am

    Yep, the Fuji X-T2 is a great 4k camera, but, the 1.17 4k crop factor is more significant than most might think, once you see a comparison. For that reason, I’m going with the X-T20. It’s image is a FRACTION less sharp with the line-skipping than that of the X-T2. It’s limited in card speed, it won’t shoot F-Log externally, it’s limited to a 10 minute 4k record with no grip option, BUT, it has the exact same color science! The X-T20 will allow me to shoot with multiple Fuji cameras, with the other being the X Pro 2. That’s right, I’ve been shooting a lot of video with the X Pro 2, and it’s 1080p image is impressive! In fact, I can’t think of another camera shooting 1080p that can top it. Canon 5D MarkII, nope, the MarkIII, nope, Markiv, nope, Nikon D800-810,nope!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 15, 2017 at 9:22 pm

      Very cool to hear that you’re suing the X-T20, Steve! Another great option from Fuji… Would love to see some footage some time if you feel like sharing your results on here.

      Reply
      • Cyprian
        August 25, 2017 at 2:16 pm

        Here’s some footage from Nepal done with Fuji X-T20 this May! https://youtu.be/Aj5wRPKceh0 Disclaimer: it was my second video created ever (well, second edit because the first one was from the same trip but from our layover in Turkey).

        Reply
        • Noam Kroll
          August 29, 2017 at 12:27 am

          Looks great! Thanks for sharing… Very nice stuff in there.

          Reply
    • James S
      February 27, 2018 at 9:36 pm

      You may have not tested the Samsung NX1. My personal view is it’s still the best hybrid mirrorless camera ever made, even in late Feb 2018, colour science and all.

      Reply
      • Noam Kroll
        February 28, 2018 at 12:10 am

        I have used it, and really love it… I am still just a sucker for those Fuji colors 🙂

        Reply
  • […] Why I Just Picked Up The Fuji X-T2 For Filmmaking + My First Impressions […]

    Reply
  • Alex
    May 12, 2017 at 6:17 pm

    Zebras???

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 12, 2017 at 10:09 pm

      Sorry! Error on the original post. Fixed now.

      Reply
  • Andre
    May 12, 2017 at 2:15 pm

    Congrats on the purchase, I was racking my brain over purchasing the GH5, XT-2 and Sony A7SII for a number of weeks and eventually went for the GH5, extremely happy with my purchase so far but I must say that I found the colors of the the Fuji to be impressive to say the least! I look forward to seeing what you can do with it.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 12, 2017 at 10:15 pm

      Thanks Andre – and congrats on the GH5! I can’t wait to shoot with it myself, and have really only heard/seen good things… Looking forward to sharing more on the GH5 with you through the blog in the near future.

      Reply
  • Piotr Naumowicz
    May 12, 2017 at 7:42 am

    I was in the same place. I’m the owner of bmcc and micro cinema camera. I was the owner of a7s but sold it because of color sience. Like for Noam for me color science is most important part of the image. I would rather shot 1080p with good colours than 4k with bad. To be fair I just finished shooting proof of concept for my next film with micro and bmcc and I’m totally happy with the results. But I’m also an photographer and I need something that I can take with me on trips and it is good in stills and video department. Finnally I’ve bought 5d mk iv for few reasons. I will explain why in my next comment.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 12, 2017 at 10:14 pm

      Thanks for the note Piotr! Great to hear about your experience and congrats on the 5D MK IV. It’s definitely a great camera too and I’m sure you’ll put it to good use.

      Reply
    • Piotr Naumowicz
      May 14, 2017 at 2:57 pm

      After almost two years of fighting with a7s I finally came to a decision to sell sony and buy another camera . Sony had two major quircks . First one was visible banding from time to time. Second one was this f****** color science. Inly to explain how much effort I put to made it right would take a crazy amount of time.

      So I sold my sony. What’s now?

      I’ve checked olympus, fuji xt-2 and x-t20, 5d mk iv and gh5. I even shoot some a7r and a6500 to check if sony repaired their mistakes in later products. Fuji color science is nice, film simulations are awesome but general look of the picture is off in my opinion. It’s hard to explain but it looks digital and sharp and structure of the picture is less organic that i can accept. Sonys was a little bit better than a7s but not much. Gh5 is good option but to be frank olympus has something in the picture that is pleasing and organic even considered that it is only 8bit. And then I’ve checked 5d. It was bit punchy even in natural style and contrast to minimum but it is easy to change it in canon app – small curve adjustment, saturation on -2 and general profile for video is ready 🙂 I also use James Miller flat log profile. It’s not a canon log but it is ok. Two things that pepole don’t like about 5d is heavy codec and crop in 4k video. In terms of codec it’s lighter than proress hq in 4k and quality is awesome so I like it. I would rather buy another card than switch to more compressed format. It’s not for everyone but for me it is perfect. Crop factor is another problem for most people. There is a lot od wrong info about it. Yes it is 1.74 but only from 3:2 full frame still format. From fullframe video it is actually 1.64 so it is near apc format. (Not so far from super35). For video I like better apsc than full frame for stills fullframe is awesome so I have best from both worlds. Need to go now but If someone has some questions feel free to ask.

      Reply
      • Noam Kroll
        May 15, 2017 at 9:28 pm

        Thanks for sharing this here Piotr… It can be really frustrating to try to decide which camera to buy, but it sounds like you really thought it through and got the best tool for your needs. THat’s really all that ever matters, and I’m sure the 5D will serve you very well. Especially with Canon C-Log coming this summer!

        Reply

Leave a Reply