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Download My Free GH4 Cine-D LUT Here! Plus, Why I’m Not Using The New GH4 Supertone Settings

Like many other GH4 shooters out there, I’ve been back and forth about which picture profiles and settings are best to use when shooting with this camera. When I first got the GH4 I was messing around with my settings a lot (master ped, shadow/highlight, etc.), but eventually realized that I would get much better results by not straining the camera too much. As such, I have mainly been using slightly modified Cine-D and Cine-V picture profiles, as outlined in this blog post from the fall.

I would say that I use Cine-D about 50% of the time, and Cine-V the other 50%. Both picture profiles can create beautiful images, but Cine-D has slightly more dynamic range so I do try to use it whenever possible. That said, Cine-V has nearly as much DR (I would guess there’s probably only a 1/2 stop difference between them), and it’s an excellent alternative to Cine-D when you need to nail the look in camera.

When grading my Cine-V footage, I never use any type of LUT in my pipeline since that picture profile already has somewhat of a finished look to it. With Cine-D however, I do always start my grading sessions with a custom LUT that I built around my preferred Cine-D settings. I have included a download link to the LUT below, but read on to ensure that your settings are consistent with mine so that the LUT will work properly.

On a side note, for any of you that aren’t familiar with LUTs (or Look Up Tables), they are essentially color translation files that you can use in many different post-production applications to apply a new look to your footage. They are used for many different reasons, but commonly to add contrast and saturation to flat images. For example if you were to shoot on an Arri Alexa in Log-C, you would want to use a LUT to give your Log-C footage a more contrasty Rec. 709 look. Here is an example of some Arri Amira footage I shot recently, with and without the Rec. 709 LUT applied:

Amira - Ungraded_1.1.1

Amira - Graded_1.1.2

It’s worth noting that you don’t always need to use a LUT to grade flat footage, but it definitely can help to speed up your process and maintain consistency across your sequence. That’s exactly why I’ve been using my custom Cine-D LUT in Resolve, and it’s saved me a ton of time over the last few months when grading my footage.

As mentioned above, the LUT is based off of my custom Cine-D settings:

Cine-D

Contrast: 0

Sharpness: -5

Noise Reduction: -5

Saturation: -5

Hue: 0

This LUT will still work with a number of different Cine-D settings, however it is optimized for the settings listed above.

Here are before and after shots showing what the LUT will do:

Ungraded Cine-D

Cine-D-GH4-Ungraded

Cine-D With Noam Kroll LUT

Cine-D-GH4-Graded

The LUT isn’t intended to be a final grade, but rather to create an optimal starting point for color correcting the image. The order of operations in which you perform your color grade is just as important as the look you are trying to achieve, so always be sure to apply this LUT before you do any further grading.

My goal with this LUT was to get my Cine-D image looking as close to Cine-V as possible while still retaining the extra 1/2 stop or so of dynamic range. As you can tell from this Cine-V shot, it isn’t all that different from Cine-D with my LUT:

Cine-V Ungraded

It may appear that there is marginally more DR in the Cine-V example, but that’s just because it hasn’t been graded at all yet. In reality there is still a small amount of extra detail that can be pulled from the shadows and highlights in the Cine-D image.

So for those of you that would like to download the .cube LUT file, you can do so by clicking here.

If you’re never installed a LUT on your system before, it’s actually quite simple. Just download the .cube file above and copy it into the LUT folder for DaVinci Resolve (or whatever platform you are using). For Resolve, these are the file paths that you can follow:

MAC

/Library/Application Support/Blackmagic Design/DaVinci Resolve/LUT/

PC

ProgramData\Blackmagic Design\DaVinci Resolve\Support\LUT

Please be sure to unzip the .cube file if your system doesn’t do it automatically.

Thoughts On The Supertone Settings

Recently some GH4 users have been playing around with a new “Supertone” setting, which was developed my Michael Medgyesi. The setting is based on the Portrait picture profile and is intended to give you a graded look straight out of the camera, with an emphasis on the mid tones.

Here are the exact settings:

Portrait

Contrast: + 3

Sharpness: +1

Noise Reduction: 0

Saturation: -5

Hue: -2

Highlight/Shadow: -5/0

I decided to test out the settings in the exact same setup that I used for my Cine-D and Cine-V tests above. As I expected, straight out of the camera I got a very high contrast image that almost had a bleach bypass look to it:

Supertone - Ungraded

Understandably, this picture profile was intended to be corrected by pushing up the saturation and presumably lifting the shadows a bit. But even still, I wasn’t thrilled with the results once I started to color grade the footage.

In all fairness if I was actually using this setting I would have lit the scene differently, but even when graded to compensate for the crushed shadows I wasn’t crazy about the look:

Supertone - Graded

I think there is a time and a place to use settings like Supertone, but for the type of shooting that I like to do – it just won’t do the trick. Supertone gives you a very specific look straight out of the camera that you are somewhat married to in post, which isn’t something I am comfortable with seeing as I grade nearly all of my footage. Not to mention, creatively it is very distinct and would only be applicable to certain types of projects in my opinion.

I like to see people pushing the boundaries of what the GH4 is capable of, and very much respect Michael Medgyesi’s approach to the GH4, but personally I am going to stick with Cine-D (and my LUT for now, or Cine-V in some cases.

UPDATE: I recently released 3 Cinematic LUT Packs, which have been carefully designed to help you achieve an organic, filmic look in post-production. They work well with any camera (including the GH4 of course), and I highly recommend them for filmmakers and cinematographers looking to achieve bold color results, while minimizing time in post-production. Be sure to check them out by clicking here!

Also – be sure to follow me on InstagramFacebook, and Twitter for more updates!

About Author

Noam Kroll is an award-winning Los Angeles based filmmaker, and the founder of the boutique production house, Creative Rebellion. His work can be seen at international film festivals, on network television, and in various publications across the globe. Follow Noam on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook for more content like this!

59 Comments

  • Chris
    September 4, 2020 at 5:43 am

    Hey Noam,
    Curious to hear your thoughts on ‘ettr’ via v log vs your cine d settings with lut. Which do you prefer?
    -Chris

    Reply
  • sam
    June 29, 2020 at 9:51 pm

    hi pal,

    so if i dont need to do post processing and have a good dynamic range overall i can get away with just Cine V ??

    one more question, is it necessary to use cine-v or cine-d in low light environments or not really ??

    thanks,

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      August 5, 2020 at 3:59 pm

      Absolutely. You can use Cine-V in any situation including low-light. It all depends on the look you’re going for and how much work you want to do it post. I’d try a few settings combinations and see what works best for your needs.

      Reply
  • Aaron Caldwell
    September 9, 2019 at 6:56 pm

    Thanks for the great information! You stated that you used Cine-V the other 50% of the time. Do you recall the settings adjustments you used (Contrast, Sat, etc)?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      November 22, 2019 at 8:59 pm

      I belive in Cine-V I kept almost everything as-is in camera, and only slightly reduced contrast to give the shadows some more detail.

      Reply
  • LINDA
    June 20, 2018 at 7:36 am

    Noam:
    Thanks for posting a Cine-D LUT. I’m using it with the Lumix FZH1(FZ2500)

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      July 13, 2018 at 3:15 am

      Glad to hear Linda! Thanks for the note 🙂

      Reply
  • Michael Stevens
    March 20, 2018 at 2:56 am

    Noam:
    Thanks for posting a Cine-D LUT. I’m using it with the Lumix FZ2500 and I thought you might be interested, that at least for me, Cine-D at -5,-5,-5, plus your LUT gives me the same as Natural mode with o adjustments.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      April 2, 2018 at 4:05 am

      Awesome! Thanks for sharing this, Michael.

      Reply
  • […] After Effects用 DSLRカラーグレーディング・プリセット(Indie Tips) – 無料の GH4 Cine-D ルックアップテーブル (Noam Kroll) – 無料の Sony S-Log3 ルックアップテーブル (Noam Kroll) – […]

    Reply
  • Anton
    December 2, 2017 at 11:41 pm

    This is awesome. Thank you so much.

    Reply
  • Lorenzo
    June 8, 2017 at 12:39 pm

    I just uploaded some test using your LUT on my G7 with little or no tweaks, got some very good (even if a bit dramatic, but i did not spend a lot of time grading, i just applied LUTS) result:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4aCuA1MPlMI

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 8, 2017 at 5:17 pm

      Thanks for sharing, Lorenzo. I’ll need to check this out soon!

      Reply
  • […] Kostenloses GH4 Cine-D LUT — Noam Kroll […]

    Reply
  • […] Free GH4 Cine-D LUT — Noam Kroll […]

    Reply
  • Duke Sweden
    December 13, 2016 at 12:59 am

    I wrote a long detailed question about this LUT and it’s not showing up. Grrrr….

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      December 13, 2016 at 5:55 pm

      Oh no, I don’t see it here! What was the question?

      Reply
  • Luc
    December 8, 2016 at 5:32 pm

    Thanks Noam, my footage looks so much better now!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      December 9, 2016 at 4:10 pm

      So glad to hear it helped Luc!

      Reply
  • Luis Lara Gilberto
    October 26, 2016 at 11:22 pm

    Hello Noam! Thanks for these great tips and the LUT!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      November 3, 2016 at 5:46 am

      Thanks Luis! Appreciate the kind words.

      Reply
  • DJPS
    October 17, 2016 at 5:03 am

    Hi Noam, I’m using Premiere Pro, rather than Resolve. Is this LUT intended to be used as an input LUT or creative LUT?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      October 17, 2016 at 9:12 pm

      It technically could work either way, but I would recommend using it as an input LUT.

      Reply
  • James
    June 8, 2016 at 7:20 pm

    Hello Noam! Thanks for these great tips and the LUT! Will this LUT work for the FZ300 4K using Cine-D with your settings? Also, how did that Hungarian Photographer using the FZ300 in Sri-Lanka correct/grade such beautiful footage? Did he shoot Cine-D or just Natural and mainly let the camera handle it? Thanks again!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 9, 2016 at 7:10 am

      Hey James! No problem at all. I haven’t tried it on the FZ300, so I’m not sure if you would get the same results, but it’s definitely worth a try. I would imagine the picture profiles must be fairly similar between the two cameras, so it is certainly something to experiment with.

      I haven’t seen the video you are referring to, but feel free to share it. Thanks!

      Reply
  • Morten
    May 13, 2016 at 11:31 am

    Hi Noam

    Your GH4 Cind D LUT is awesome…saved me a lot of trouble getting my Cine D scenes look right. Thx a lot!

    Cheers from Morten, Denmark

    Reply
  • Marcos
    March 26, 2016 at 12:39 pm

    Hello there! Noam, forgive me my ignorance, I’m not a professional videographer… Is it possible to use it on Final Cut Pro X? Can you tell the correct way to add it to Final Cut if it is possible? Thanks.

    Reply
  • Baptiste
    February 5, 2016 at 1:12 pm

    Hi Noam
    Before anything, thank you for sharing!
    Then, do you expose correct or 1/2 Of 1 more f/stop in order to get more information in post?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      February 8, 2016 at 7:26 pm

      Not a problem at all! I usually expose correctly, but would imagine overexposing slightly (about a half stop) couldn’t hurt either…

      Reply
  • Timothy
    January 31, 2016 at 9:37 pm

    Hi Noam!
    A lot of GH4 users set their contrast from -2 to -5 (in any profile) to achiev flatter image for postproduction. What do you think about it? What is the reason why you don’t do it?
    And I also heard about HUE +1 (and +2 if you shot under LED light).
    Thank you

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      February 1, 2016 at 1:38 am

      Hi Timothy – I have found that messing around with contrast can help in certain situations, but in others it can introduce noise. My reasoning for keeping the settings at 0 is usually just for consistent results, since I don’t want to risk introducing shadow noise… I haven’t tried adjusting the hue with LED lights, but that’s definitely worth checking out!

      Reply
      • Timothy
        February 1, 2016 at 10:04 pm

        I’m sorry, yesterday I just found your blog and start to read it all. And I found the answer in your earlier posts about gh4 settings. Anyway thank you 🙂
        So, I have one more question – have you ever tried 4k 4:2:0 8bit resample to 2k 4:4:4 10bit in luminance channel?

        Reply
        • Noam Kroll
          February 8, 2016 at 7:20 pm

          Thanks Tim! I haven’t tried resampling to 10bit, but would be interested to hear if that makes any difference. Be sure to post some results here if you test it out.

          Reply
  • mtle
    January 20, 2016 at 6:58 am

    Hey Noam!
    Been enjoying your blog posts, I have a question in regards to your workflow with this LUT, do you normally set this as your 2nd node or preferably at the end? I know there isn’t a “correct” way, just wondering how you do your colour grading.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      January 20, 2016 at 9:40 pm

      Thanks! I actually use this as my primary (1st) node, and then adjust things from there. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  • […] * Cinelike D is a modified version of the settings and free LUT I found here. […]

    Reply
  • […] * Cinelike D is a modified version of the settings and free LUT I found here. […]

    Reply
  • Emek
    December 14, 2015 at 2:37 pm

    Hi Noam! Really helpful info, I really appreciate it! Could you please tell me if which color space you use (sRGB or Adobe RGB) and if you have noticed better skin tones in either color mode?

    Keep up with the good work!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      December 21, 2015 at 7:16 pm

      Any time! I use sRGB typically, and haven’t noticed a benefit to skin tones either way… Great question though.

      Reply
  • David T
    October 27, 2015 at 6:14 pm

    Thanks, Noam–very thoughtful and informative.

    Reply
  • Jeff Kirkland
    September 20, 2015 at 10:13 pm

    I only found this post a few weeks ago but I wanted to come back and say thanks for the LUT. I’ve used your settings and the LUT on every shoot I’ve done since then and, for the first time ever, I’m super happy with the results from my GH4.

    Brilliant!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      October 2, 2015 at 12:24 am

      That’s so great to hear Jeff! Thanks for the note.

      Reply
  • mike
    July 10, 2015 at 4:03 am

    Hi Noam,
    I’ve been using a tweaked Natural profile that I think looks good straight out of the camera but I am intrigued by Cine-D.
    I tried your Cine-d setting plus your lut in resolve.
    I got something that was way too warm and orange skin.
    I’m guessing white balance was off.
    Which leads me to my question, if I can’t eyeball the white balance and dont have the luxury of shooting a gray card (i do weddings) how do I know if my white balance is kind of correct? Or is there no way to do that?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      July 21, 2015 at 6:33 pm

      Hey Mike – Yes, it definitely sounds like the WB was off as there isn’t any color shifting in the LUT. Typically, I recommend shooting at 5600K for daylight and 3200K for tungsten. Often times you’ll be inside a house where you have a mix of both (some window light and some practicals) in which case you can split the difference and try 4200K or so. Hope this helps!

      Reply
      • mike
        July 21, 2015 at 9:53 pm

        Thanks Noam,
        For cine-d there is no way for me to eyeball the white balance as it is too flat.
        Thanks for the tips man, they have been very helpful.

        Reply
        • Noam Kroll
          July 28, 2015 at 10:10 pm

          Of course! Glad to hear it’s been helpful.

          Reply
  • Ryan
    June 24, 2015 at 10:43 pm

    Hey! We’re shooting a feature film currently in Montana solely on 3 GH4’s, vintage FD Glass, and the Ronin-M. I’m the DP of the project, and shooting with your cinelike-D profile, Noam! Here’s a link to our page: http://kck.st/1BTy95h

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      July 2, 2015 at 8:14 pm

      Great to hear! Good luck with the project.

      Reply
  • Tom
    June 20, 2015 at 7:05 pm

    Here is a LUT direct from Panasonic:

    http://pro-av.panasonic.net/en/varicam/35/dl.html

    As stated in these LOG shootout between GH4 and A7S:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLrw5yAo53U

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 22, 2015 at 4:54 pm

      Thanks for sharing Tom – although I believe this LUT is for V-Log, correct?

      Reply
      • Tom
        June 22, 2015 at 7:44 pm

        Yes V-Log, and in the video I see is applicable to V-Log-L too.

        Reply
  • Ash Tailor
    June 20, 2015 at 12:54 pm

    Hey Noam!

    Long time reader and fan. Thank you for all the posts that you do to inform us and share the knowledge.

    What was the Master P setting on your camera? and also the Highlight and shadow curve on the camera? This will undoubtedly have an effect on your LUT, etc

    Thanks again

    Ash

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 22, 2015 at 4:53 pm

      Thanks so much Ash. I typically leave the master ped a 0 as it seems to introduce a lot of noise when I bring it up. The highlight/shadow is also set to default.

      Good luck with the LUT!

      Reply
  • Arya Boustani
    June 13, 2015 at 5:57 pm

    Thanks Naomi. I found Resolve is excellent in dealing with independent anchor points to steep up the mid tone curve while getting a heck of tangential profile at the extreme bright and dark to reveal those areas enough. I found I need to compensate for the steep up in adjacent areas so I add an anchor point for the high mid tone and one for low mid tone and then that combination creates a situation that I can get a nice shadow on the face without making it too intense.I will try your setting for sure. Just one thing is that I think Portrait is meant for artistic mid tones rather than looking realistic. I found there is the trend for making things look more interesting and a lot of times to the same extent the image ends up looking kind of particular and processed. Ideally one would hope that there is a combination of interesting and organic at the same time which could be the limitation of sensor, processing unit, and even lens and lighting. The other thing is that I found out different settings are useful for different scenarios. With you being in front of extreme background and key light, this setting combination is working, but if you are in a situation of much darker ambient light or flatter bright light, it would need a different combination and treatment. Also there are some settings to get more dynamic range out of the unit but the pay off is noise. If someone gives priority to dynamic range and deals with the noise through a plugin like Neat Video, then they could perhaps use a different set of variables to achieve what they are after.

    Reply
  • Lee Mackreath
    June 9, 2015 at 9:57 am

    Thanks for the info. With the Panasonic G7 coming out next week with the same cine v and cine d picture profiles do you think your tests\settings would work the same with that camera?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 9, 2015 at 4:12 pm

      I think they will be really close! I can’t say for sure as I haven’t used the G7 yet, but I would image the image will be nearly identical.

      Reply
  • Lennart
    June 7, 2015 at 9:05 am

    Hi!

    Do you have any advice like this article for Samsung NX1?

    Best Regards
    Lennart

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      June 9, 2015 at 4:10 pm

      Not yet, as I have only shot with the camera a few times. There is a flat setting on the camera that I recommend using (Gamma DR I believe), but other than that, I would leave the settings as is personally.

      Reply

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