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After Hearing From Nearly 40 Distributors About My Feature, I Chose To Self-Distribute. Here’s Why…

Back in June of this year, my feature film SHADOWS ON THE ROAD premiered here in Los Angeles as a part of Dances With Films. As a result, we received nearly 40 inquiries from distributors and sales agents that were interested in the film. In the end though, after speaking to each of them in detail, it became abundantly clear that self distribution would be the way to go.

Not every distributor we spoke to made an offer on the film, but quite a few did. Certainly far more than I would have imagined, given that the feature has no known actors in it and is primarily a drama.

A couple of the offers we received included a small payout upfront, but the vast majority had no minimum guarantee (MG). Considering that we shot the film for only $12K, some of the offers that did come in were enticing, at least financially. Even a small MG would cover a big chunk (if not all) of our budget, and any additional revenue from future sales would be the icing on the cake. It was something to consider…

In a sense, I felt like we were in a good position. Especially after speaking to friends/colleagues of mine, who received similar offers for their films – most of which had larger budgets and more recognizable talent. I felt fortunate this film was having offers made on it, and thoroughly considered all of them before making any final decisions.

In the back of my mind though, I couldn’t help but also consider the groundswell of indie filmmakers favoring self distribution (listen to my interview with Jim Cummings for more on this). With each passing year, the case for self distribution just gets better and better.

There are more platforms available than ever before. It’s become easier and cheaper to market indie films, largely thanks to social media. And most importantly, it’s become possible to retain complete control over your work in a way that never really existed before.

That last point – retaining control – is what mattered most to me when making my decision.

I’ve heard many of the same horror stories from filmmakers as you probably have – A distribution company offers nothing for a film up front, takes forever to market it, eventually makes a couple of small deals (possibly bundled with other projects of theirs), but despite making some sales no money ever goes back to the filmmaker. This often is a result of the distributor needing to “recoup” all their marketing costs before paying the filmmaker, often resulting in no net profit.

Now, please keep in mind I am not suggesting all indie-level distributors work like this. I spoke to quite a few at length over the past few months, and truly believe that most of them operate with integrity and transparency. I didn’t doubt their honesty at all… My larger concern was how much attention and focus my film would actually get within their ecosystem.

In the end, I just didn’t feel that any distributor I spoke with would champion the film in the same way that I would. This production was a micro-budget labor of love from the get-go, and only got to this point through blood, sweat, and tears. I couldn’t imagine any distributor at this level dedicating themselves to this project with the same intensity that myself and my team have.

As my projects continue to grow in size and scope, I would of course welcome the opportunity to work with a traditional distributor, provided it was the right fit. But for this particular film at this specific time in the history of film, self distribution was clearly the way to go.

In terms of our specific strategy, it is going to be relatively simple and highly focused –

For starters, we are going to first release the film through iTunes (using Distribber as our aggregator), on a 90 day window. This means the film will not be available on any other platform for the first 90 days.

You might wonder – Why not just release on all platforms at once?

Some people do. In our case though, our resources are limited and we will be best served by going “all in” on one platform. And that platform of course is iTunes, because it’s by far the largest TVOD marketplace for indie films.

By focusing heavily on iTunes, we can maximize all of our marketing efforts by narrowing our focus. For instance, if we use social media ads to market the movie, everyone that is interested in purchasing the film will need to do so on the iTunes Store. This in turn could drive our numbers up on iTunes (since we won’t be spreading purchases over other platforms), and that could lead to a higher ranking on the store.

If we can achieve a high ranking (lets say by breaking the top 100 in one specific category), that will lead to more sales. It will take a lot of work to get there, but it’s certainly been done before.

After the 90 day window, we will release the film to other TVOD (transactional VOD) platforms, like Amazon and Google Play. There will be no limit to how many stores we sell our film on at this point, as any marketing that we do from here on will not be tied to one specific platform.

During this same period, we will likely work with Distribber to pitch the film to SVOD (subscription VOD) platforms like Netflix and Hulu. It’s anyones guess as to whether or not the film will get picked up, but this is the time to try. Once the film is available on SVOD platforms it will become more difficult to sell it on TVOD, so it’s very standard practice to only move to streaming platforms after doing a transactional run.

One or two years from now, we will also consider releasing the film on AVOD (ad-based VOD) platforms, like Tubi TV. Apparently you can’t expect to see much revenue from AVOD right now (just a little bit, each time an ad is played), but these types of platforms still may help expand the film’s lifespan nonetheless.

Of course, I also have to mention that a major part of our strategy involves advertising for the film, largely using social media. Our advertising efforts will likely run on and off over the course of the next year, but the vast majority will take place in the very early months.

By far our biggest push (and biggest spend) will be on the initial iTunes release. The bigger that release is, the greater the ripple effect it will have across all platforms as we eventually branch out. We will run other campaigns in the future too, but the first will be the most substantial.

We plan to to experiment with several different ad campaigns, primarily on Facebook, each targeting different demographics. Based on the results we get, we will refine our advertising efforts (by narrowing the demographics we focus on, and the content we push to them), until we find the right combination. The goal of course, is to reach the most amount of people that truly want to see the movie, for the least amount of money. This takes a lot of trial and error.

At some point in the future, I may write a whole article detailing our advertising strategy. So if you’re interested in hearing more about that topic, please let me know in the comments.

I am currently in pre-production for my next feature set to shoot this fall (more info on that soon!), and going through this distribution process right now is extremely motivating. It’s hard to say with certainty whether I’ll self-distribute my next film (I’ll see how this one goes first), but it’s certainly the frontrunner in my mind as of now.

There is an incredible opportunity for filmmakers right now to create incredible DIY projects for very little money, and make a profit by selling them directly to an audience. It’s not an easy path to take, and there is no magic bullet for success. But it can be done, and will only become a more viable option for indie filmmakers as the years go on… And I for one, am looking forward to jumping on this train and seeing where it takes me.

For more content like this, be sure to follow me on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter!

About Author

Noam Kroll is an award-winning Los Angeles based filmmaker, and the founder of the boutique production house, Creative Rebellion. His work can be seen at international film festivals, on network television, and in various publications across the globe. Follow Noam on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook for more content like this!

93 Comments

  • Jorge Silva
    October 12, 2019 at 12:35 pm

    You forgot to mention how iTunes charge a large fee to get our film on their platform and Netflix or Hulu require Agents. I personally use Filmhub for no upfront costs and it’s delivered to all of them. It’s in the market to be picked up. So far my films have been picked by 3 Amazon channels and two Roku channels. I’m sure there will be more. But it’s interesting to see how the films bring the audience to your work and it’s really cool. I also created our our viewing on our own platform in pay per view form and people pay to watch our films. It’s been quite successful!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      November 22, 2019 at 9:24 pm

      Awesome to hear, Jorge. Thanks so much for sharing this here.

      Reply
  • John Gardiner
    September 27, 2019 at 1:56 pm

    This is an old post but I wonder if you could share actual data for your project (ROI) especially in light of the disturbing news that Distribber was now gone bankrupt? My heart goes out to all of those filmmakers that will be impacted from this news and wonder how this will set back the self distribution model? Or perhaps will this be an opportunity to rethink how best to creatively think about using our content to generate revenue. But back to why one would even self distribute in the first place is to ultimately have greater control and yield more ROI. There have been a ton of articles/blog posts on self distribution (either by aggregators and filmmakers alike) but for some reason nobody ever likes to reveal the true numbers that a film can potentially realize.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      November 22, 2019 at 9:16 pm

      Yes, I plan to detail this in the near future. Working on a long post about DIY/self-distribution and will share it here on the blog once complete.

      Reply
  • jason toler
    July 29, 2019 at 10:01 pm

    Saw your film good stuff! Thank you so much for sharing this information. Alot of us ( inde film makers ) make a lot of mistakes or get ripped off my distribution companies and cant recoup our investment and will not be able to move on to the next project so sharing info is key I got into a VERY bad deal with my first film “Half Moon” I put it out through Distribber on Itunes once I got my rights back. Im in post on my second film ” Crackhouse of the Dead’ and hope for better results! Much success to you on this and the next one !

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      August 22, 2019 at 2:05 am

      Appreciate it, Jason. And likewise! Hope all goes well for you with your distribution process.

      Reply
  • Metro
    July 20, 2019 at 3:57 pm

    HI Noam, it’s July 2019 and I’d sure love to hear how things are going. I shot a Pilot and I’m ready to get it out there. (Right now: Do you have some follow-up advice for folks like me?)

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      August 22, 2019 at 1:50 am

      Yes, still working on it. I will aim to do a follow up post in September. Stay tuned!

      Reply
  • Angela Lamb
    May 5, 2019 at 9:46 pm

    Would iTunes still be your first step when distributing an 8 episode docuseries? Thank you!!! Angela

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 17, 2019 at 10:28 pm

      It’s very possible, but all depends on your goals. Is the primary goal exposure or revenue?

      Reply
  • graham leader
    April 24, 2019 at 6:05 pm

    noam,
    i’m not sure how i even came across this article but i’m pleased that i did because it’s very thoughtful and measured and based upon the hard facts of the current marketplace. i have 2 music docs – HEARTWORN HIGHWAYS, which is quite acclaimed, and it’s sequel HEARTWORN HIGHWAY REVISITED, as well as a narrative feature with alan bates and lambert wilson (please see my website), all of which will most likely be distributed independently…

    it would be good to have a conversation sometime, if you’d be up for that. maybe we could even help one another… ?
    look forward to hearing from you.
    good luck!
    graham.

    Reply
  • Basil Miller
    April 16, 2019 at 12:35 pm

    Hi Noam,

    Your post is terrific, and a great signpost for myself and my partner in approaching VO distribution for a series we plan to start shooting this year.

    Did you ever write the post on your advertising/marketing effort? If so, maybe you could append a link in these comments.

    And, as so many have asked you — please keep me in the loop on this subject.

    Many thanks for sharing your invaluable experience.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 17, 2019 at 10:06 pm

      Thanks a lot, Basil! And congratulations on your series. I haven’t yet posted my follow up article, but plan to in the near future. Stay tuned!

      Reply
  • Michael Buday
    March 26, 2019 at 10:15 pm

    Noam,

    Very informative – thank you. Just finished watching a video by Griffin Hammond, where he talks at length about self distributing his short film “Sriracha.” He goes into detail re: revenue he received from Vimeo, Amazon Prime, Hulu and iTunes. By far, he got the most revenue from Vimeo given they take only 10%+ credit card fees (about 7K people rented the film) I think iTunes was 2nd in terms of revenue. Amazon Prime, despite 500K viewers, was way behind given the current .6/hour payout.

    I just finished a feature length doc and I’m thinking of focusing on Vimeo VOD alone. The trick will be building an audience and getting them the RENT NOW button 😉

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 17, 2019 at 9:53 pm

      Vimeo is definitely a great platform to sell on. I would certainly start there, and then consider widening up and releasing on other platforms so more people can access it over time.

      Reply
  • John Doby
    March 15, 2019 at 10:06 am

    Thank you for this article. I currently have my first backyard indie feature film in production, and planning on a DIY marketing/distribution strategy. So I’ve been devouring info like this. Please keep me in the loop for your follow up article.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      May 17, 2019 at 9:43 pm

      Absolutely – working on it as we speak.

      Reply
  • Butch Berry
    March 3, 2019 at 5:18 pm

    I’d be interested in your ad strategy and results.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      March 5, 2019 at 5:28 pm

      Working on a follow up piece… Stay tuned!

      Reply
  • Uttam
    March 2, 2019 at 7:49 am

    Noam,
    Since your first post about Distribber, I wonder how it’s faring? I have made an indie film and am considering all the options of self distribution.
    Good luck.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      March 5, 2019 at 5:28 pm

      So far, so good! I don’t have any other baseline to compare them too, but I haven’t run into any issues so far. I’ve also heard good things about Quiver, so I really don’t think you can go wrong either way.

      Reply
  • Joji Varughese
    February 22, 2019 at 4:36 pm

    This was very helpful Noah! This is the exact same path I’m taking my new film “Penance.” Aside from withholding it from public release and submitting to festivals via Filmfreeway, it’s in the hands of Distribber. They’re giving great guidance for a first-timer in the digital platform route. I had only planned for Netflix, Hulu and Amazon but your article has me reconsidering my list to TVOD, SVOD and finally AVOD.
    Good luck with all your future endeavors!
    -Joji Varughese

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      March 5, 2019 at 5:23 pm

      Awesome to hear, Joli! Best of luck with the release – I’ll keep my eye out for it.

      Reply
  • […] has not only become a viable option, but the single best option out there. As I outlined in this blog post last year, many traditional distributors simply don’t offer enough value to independent […]

    Reply
  • Brad
    February 10, 2019 at 10:59 am

    Congrats Noam! Great article.

    Working on the other side of the coin, I can say with absolute confidence, no matter which road you go down it will be very difficult and you’re correct about most distributors taking a good chunk of money; some in marketing expenses (which they usually don’t provide an actual cost breakdown for), platform fees (and of course if they offer an MG it puts your film even further behind).

    Most films will see the majority of their money in the first 9 months (3 quarters) after that it starts to go downhill (depending on the film) some start picking up steam when introduced to other platforms, which breathes new life into them. We’ve seen this happen before on titles that weren’t making any (or very little) money in the beginning and then all of a sudden start generating more revenue when placed on a new platform.

    Amazon Prime used to be the best option to start out on – if you were able to get an audience going, but ever since they’ve changed their policies the distributors I work for look more towards TVOD and AVOD (also some SVOD over seas). Selling anything to Hulu, but especially Netflix is almost impossible these days. Some distributors will also try to sell TV rights, but again it’s a long shot.

    Your best bet is to hopefully make money domestically, because indie films over seas are an even harder sell (unless it’s horror). That’s why some distribution companies will bundle films together in hopes of making some money for all the films. The more they have in their library the more deals they can make, but it also means getting your film in more places and more opportunities for “you” the filmmaker to make some money.

    It’s a common misconception that offering your film on multiple platforms dilutes the ability to make more money. That’s not entirely accurate especially with so many people using so many different platforms for playing their streaming content. I prefer VUDU myself and own over 1k titles, old and new along with tv shows as well. Some people prefer the free option (e.g. Tubi TV or AVOD). People tend to be finicky when it comes to paying for movies they know nothing about and has no names.

    Also keep in mind some companies have a lot of overhead, which is why they are looking for bulk deals because they are upside down (negative debt) and those distribution companies don’t usually spend that much time marketing your film (which includes posters, reviewers, and even trailer creation). Their main concern is getting your product out there as quickly as possible.

    I’ve seen several films including ones that I’ve worked on years ago get distributed and the distribution company would make a new trailer only to end up using my original trailer in the end and charging the filmmaker for the new trailer that they never used. They mislead and misrepresent films as well with poster creations that have nothing to do with the film in order to fool the consumer and make a quick buck.

    The market is definitely getting tougher for indie filmmakers in every genre due to over saturation, but also now that certain platforms are becoming more strict to the point where they are declining certain films (for content) or certain trailers (censorship) on their site (I see this mostly with iTunes – but some SVOD’s are following their lead) even social media has started cracking down on ad based spots making it more difficult on both indie distributors and filmmakers when it comes to advertising on social media.

    I can’t speak for all distribution companies and I’ve heard some horror stories from other filmmakers, so I can understand your reasoning for going this alone. I wish all distributors would be more transparent especially explaining where their marketing expenses are going, but that’s not always the case.

    Social Media is a great tool for marketing, but I’ve discovered more recently there’s a lot of holes in social media advertising and Dramas are a hard sell in the indie space especially with no names.

    I wish you well on your future projects and the best of luck to you on your current film!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      March 5, 2019 at 5:16 pm

      Wow, thank you so much for this detailed response Brad. Really appreciate you adding your two cents, and you’ve got loads of valid points here. Would love to interview you sometime on my podcast – feel free to email info@noamkroll.com if you are interested.

      Reply
  • CHRIS
    January 26, 2019 at 12:59 am

    Please do a post about your advertising strategy.

    Reply
  • Terry Hirsch
    December 26, 2018 at 3:16 am

    Hello Noam,

    I would like to see the article on your marketing campaign, as well. Thank you for posting this article.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      January 17, 2019 at 1:13 am

      For sure! Thanks for the request, Terry.

      Reply
  • Rich Styles
    December 25, 2018 at 10:46 am

    Great article, Noam. I’ve been making movies for many years & you’re right to self dist in these times. Especially since you made your movie so cost effectively, congrats on that 4 sure!! I would luv to hear your marketing strategy as I think its’s thee smartest way to go for your movie & for most movies made as Indies today. Bets of luck & Happy Holidays,
    Rich

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      January 17, 2019 at 1:12 am

      Thanks Rich! Quite a few people have asked about this, so I will aim to put together some sort of guide in the future.

      Reply
  • Bobby Kerecz
    December 11, 2018 at 9:43 pm

    Hi Noam

    Great article and congrats on your decision to self distribute. My wife and I have shot our first feature on a ramen noodle budget and are inspired to go self distribution. We will probably go thru Distribber and focus on iTunes. We have no known actors but have an excellent sound track. The actors we do have are musicians and have a huge following. I would like some feedback on how to market this movie to our musicians fan base. Any advice would be much appreciated. Thanks and happy filmmaking.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      January 17, 2019 at 1:04 am

      Awesome! Congrats on getting the movie done. I will definitely aim to cover this topic in more detail in the coming months – working on an article as we speak.

      Reply
  • Kenny Jezek
    December 1, 2018 at 4:11 pm

    Hi Noam.
    Congratulations on your film and thank you for the article. I would be most interested in hearing about your marketing strategy and it’s effectiveness and eagerly look forward to seeing that article so please do write about it.

    I am involved with indie film production and had co-produced an indi film with a similar budget. And I have spoken with Jason Brubaker about it and Distribber. But I’ve been reluctant to put any more money into this film because I’m not sure how well it could do. But your article has inspired me. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      January 17, 2019 at 12:58 am

      Awesome, Kenny! Wishing you the best of luck and a successful release.

      Reply
  • marcel mandu
    November 23, 2018 at 1:10 am

    re: you may write a whole article detailing your advertising strategy.

    Yes, please keep us posted and many thanks for all the info so far!
    Marcel Mandu, multi award winning filmmaker (feature and music video).

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      January 16, 2019 at 7:58 pm

      Awesome! I am working on it now, and thanks so much for the note.

      Reply
  • Mark Schwab
    November 12, 2018 at 6:30 pm

    Thank you so much for the article Noam. I’ve also heard some very bad stories about Distribber from my fellow indie filmmakers so I’m glad you are having a positive experience with them.

    My only issue here is that it seems like A LOT of work to self-distribute a feature film. How many hours are you needing to devote in order to see profit? How many attempts at “target marketing” the correct social media algorithms before hitting the right one? Also, in my experience with getting my first feature film distributed (also low-budget with no “names” in it) through a traditional distribution company, most of my money will be coming from worldwide territories – probably 75% at least. North America sales are much less which, to me, means that you will also need experience in selling to foreign markets which all have different encoding issues and language thickets to navigate. When I see all the work my distributor is doing, there is no way I would want to attempt it.

    I do agree with you though that there are plenty of “two dudes in a garage” – style distributors that are nothing more than content farms – not worth most indie filmmaker’s time and should be avoided.

    I absolutely get that you are best suited to be motivated to champion your film – I would be too. But unless you’re a social marketing expert with tons of connections, it seems like too many hours of work to be worth the ROI. I would also be VERY curious to follow your self-distribution/marketing journey.

    Great blog and really looking forward to seeing SHADOWS ON THE ROAD!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      November 14, 2018 at 4:57 pm

      Thanks Mark! You’re right – it’s a lot of work. I don’t want to do it forever, but for me – it’s worth the sweat equity on this film (and the next) so I can lay the groundwork for a smoother process in the future, where I can be more hands off. It’s really just a personal preference thing I suppose, but I like to get my hands dirty and learn by doing before bringing in others to take control of the wheel. Not to say that’s the only way to go, but it’s what is intuitive for me! Will definitely share more on this topic in the near future…

      Reply
  • Cesar O Perez-Beato
    November 5, 2018 at 11:21 pm

    Thank you for this article! It is good not to put all the eggs in one basket. Self distribution is a better option, definetely.

    Reply
  • Curtis
    October 22, 2018 at 8:21 pm

    Great article Noam. I’m a DIY filmmaker as well and have been looking into self-distro…and spend a lot of time studying/researching social media and online advertising. I would love to hear more about your advertising strategies.

    Best wishes,
    Curtis Kessinger

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      November 14, 2018 at 5:36 am

      Thanks Curtis! I’ll definitely share more about that in a future post. Stay tuned.

      Reply
  • H Wolfe 3
    October 16, 2018 at 2:11 am

    Thanks for sharing your experience. I’m in a similar situation, with a feature film I successfully completed and premiered. Although I did not have distributors lined up to buy the film, I’m leaning heavily with controlling the rights to the film and going with Distribber. Amy feedback with your experience with them would be appreciated.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      November 14, 2018 at 5:29 am

      Absolutely – I plan on sharing more on this front soon. Congrats on your film as well!

      Reply
  • Darren Coyle
    October 13, 2018 at 5:23 am

    Hey, Noam. Thanks for posting this. Very informative. I am just doing the festival circuit with our feature “Chasing Sunshine” (http://chasingsunshinemovie.com ) and wondering what we should do next. I have been starting talks with distributors and aggregators, and it’s all very confusing. Can you give us some numbers? I see your budget was $12,000 but what have you ended up getting from your self-distribution?
    I am not asking for exact numbers… but did you recoup your production budget? Were you able to see a profit, or the promise of a profit down the line?

    Again, congrats on the film. I’d love to hear more!

    –Darren

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      November 14, 2018 at 5:26 am

      Congrats Darren! Feel free to e-mail me at info@noamkroll.com and I’ll be happy to answer questions about all this.

      Reply
  • Joseph Tray
    October 7, 2018 at 3:29 am

    What are the options besides Distribber for getting onto iTunes?

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      November 14, 2018 at 5:22 am

      There are several… Quiver is probably the most popular. Filmhub is another option.

      Reply
  • R V
    October 6, 2018 at 3:25 am

    You can get your film on Amazon Video Direct yourself, just upload video/poster/trailer/etc assets and closed captions (in English, and German and Japanese if you have but require separate film title accounts nowadays in those languages, than link to your bank account for monthly royalty payments

    Reply
  • Loran H Bolding
    September 29, 2018 at 3:38 pm

    From one indie filmmaker to another this is incredibly informative. Thank you so much for writing this article. It’s motivating, inspiring and I am in the process of doing all this for our film Redemption’s Price. I would love to hear more about your advertising stragedy when you can.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      November 14, 2018 at 5:13 am

      Thanks, Loran! And congrats on getting your film off the ground. I will definitely share more in the near future.

      Reply
  • Alexander Monelli
    September 28, 2018 at 7:52 pm

    Noam,

    Thank you for writing this. My feature documentary (www.facebook.com/AtTheDrivein) also screened at Dances With Films this year and this article solidified my decision to self-distribute. How long does it take from uploading to Distribber to showing up on iTunes (I realize your film may not be on iTunes yet so don’t worry if you can’t answer that). Good luck with the release. I can’t wait to see it.

    -Alexander Monelli

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      November 14, 2018 at 5:12 am

      Awesome! Congrats on your screening as well. It took us about 2 – 3 months all in… Feel free to e-mail me with questions to info@noamkroll.com

      Reply
  • Patrick
    September 15, 2018 at 5:03 pm

    Congrats on the finish and release! Wishing you the best as it moves forward.

    I’m also interested in hearing (reading?) about your publicity/advertising strategies at this budget level!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      November 14, 2018 at 4:50 am

      Thanks Patrick! I will certainly post an update soon as a follow up.

      Reply
  • Vivek
    September 5, 2018 at 6:04 am

    Hey, Noam, thanks for sharing your wonderful experience with us I like the way you explained here. Now I am waiting for your next film.

    Please keep sharing.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      September 14, 2018 at 8:33 pm

      I’m working on it! Lots more to come very soon 🙂

      Reply
      • farah
        October 6, 2018 at 3:41 pm

        Hey I would love to work with you if you film in San Francisco….

        Reply
        • Noam Kroll
          November 14, 2018 at 5:22 am

          Will keep it in mind for the future!

          Reply
  • Dave
    September 2, 2018 at 2:18 pm

    Of course would love to hear about the advertising specifics as well. Thanks as always for the great info, can’t wait to see the film!

    Reply
  • Jose
    August 30, 2018 at 8:41 am

    I heard really bad things about Distribber, not paying on time or not at all.

    Why did you chose this option and how is it working for you?

    Jose

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      September 14, 2018 at 8:29 pm

      So far I’ve had a great experience with them… They were the most accessible throughout the whole process and really took time to educate me each step of the way.

      Reply
    • Riley
      September 27, 2018 at 11:13 pm

      Jose, I can confirm that this is true. For the last several years, I have distributed a movie through Distribber, and at first I loved the whole concept of being able to self-distribute my film. However with Distribber, there are lousy metrics to understand your sales, and every time my payment is due I have to write several emails asking for payment that gets to be months overdue. I still think these aggregators are the way to go, but we will not use Distribber again in the future. Anybody have recommendations for other services?

      Reply
      • Erica
        July 26, 2019 at 10:16 am

        Hi Riley
        We have a film with Distribber, too. Our payments are getting later and later. They told me months ago the reason for a delay was that some of the platforms changed their payment dates. We are on ITunes & Amazon. Our last payment is now 3 Months overdue. It’s frustrating that I have to write them about it. They are telling me now that they are getting a new accounting team up to speed, but it took me over a week to get that answer.
        I was wondering if ITunes would allow us to get payments directly since Distribber has been paid for their work.
        Erica

        Reply
        • Noam Kroll
          August 22, 2019 at 2:02 am

          That’s really too bad, Erica. Did you solve this issue yet? Would love to know how it panned out for you.

          Reply
  • Jamal
    August 30, 2018 at 5:14 am

    Definitely keep us posted on your strategy, lessons and successes, best wishes.

    Reply
  • Goran Spoljaric
    August 27, 2018 at 5:33 am

    Hi. Thanks for posting. Definitely interested in an article about advertising specifics.

    Reply
  • Andrzej
    August 25, 2018 at 8:09 am

    Fingers crossed from Poland! 🙂
    I’ve learned a tone from you and would love to get to know more about advertising strategy as you mentioned you’re thinking about writing article.
    All the best.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      September 14, 2018 at 8:26 pm

      Good to know, and thanks so much! I will aim to cover this topic in the future.

      Reply
  • Em Kay
    August 25, 2018 at 6:23 am

    Best wishes on this experiment, Noam!

    Yes, I would love to read a post on your advertising strategy.

    Reply
  • Carsten Tschach
    August 24, 2018 at 2:04 pm

    I just want to see the movie…now! 🙂

    Reply
  • Hal Tatlidil
    August 22, 2018 at 1:36 pm

    Hi Noam, thank you. The article is very helpful. I’m new to filmmaking and the distribution side of things is an even bigger mystery.

    Wrote my first script, made it on a shoe string and it was just selected to a film festival! Very excited!

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      September 14, 2018 at 8:19 pm

      Congrats Hal! Would love to see it some time.

      Reply
  • Ingerson
    August 22, 2018 at 9:30 am

    Is your iTunes focus planned for NA or worldwide? One first, other regions later?

    I live in Europe and one of the most annoying things I know are region lock. Sure I can use a VPN for Netflix, but buying something from iTunes is harder since my Apple ID is locked to my local iTunes Store.

    Before streaming it was just as bad: Watching a great film on a festival and then it never showed up on DVD/BD over here, but I had to import it (and of course buying a region free player first).

    Reply
    • Carsten
      August 24, 2018 at 2:28 pm

      I totally agree and feel the same. I’m a big fan of buying movies from platforms like Vimeo. It just works, stays in my library forever and I can even download it to my devices and watch it while traveling. But more important: it’s independent from the Apple ecosystem and I can easily watch this on my projector at home. It’s pretty much like going to a cinema.

      Yes, you can download it from there and it does not have any DRM – but let’s face it: People who download movies without paying for it, would never pay for the movie on any other platform.

      While I understand the idea to just focus on one platform, I’m not sure that it makes a lot of a difference.

      The main problem I see for visitors of your blog, they want to watch the movie now. It it takes another month or two, people will forget about the movie and walk on…

      Reply
      • Noam Kroll
        September 14, 2018 at 8:22 pm

        Good points, Carsten. Appreciate the note and certainly something to keep in mind.

        Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      September 14, 2018 at 8:19 pm

      Thanks for checking. We now live on iTunes, but in non-english speaking countries we need to roll out separately since the film needs subtitles for each language. Hopefully we will be across all of Europe soon!

      Reply
      • Ingerson
        September 15, 2018 at 6:24 am

        I can help with a Swedish translation. Got experience in fansubbing x)

        Reply
        • Noam Kroll
          November 14, 2018 at 4:49 am

          I might take you up on that!

          Reply
  • trey e
    August 21, 2018 at 11:51 pm

    Would love to hear about the advertising strategy.

    Reply
    • Noam Kroll
      September 14, 2018 at 8:18 pm

      Thanks Trey! Will aim to cover this in the future.

      Reply
    • Steve webb
      January 4, 2019 at 3:27 pm

      Great article I am going to follow your lead and try to cut out the guys just trying to screw melon promotion fees I am in Ky going to shoot first 2 episodes in April of a reality show pilot hope to get it in under the wire at under $10,000. Feel free to contact me paducahfilms.com Steve 4159876706 Big Dog productions

      Reply

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